lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2004]   [Dec]   [21]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
Subject2.6.10-rc3, syslogd hangs then processes get stuck in schedule_timeout
I'm still seeing this problem.  It repeats every week or week and a half, 
usually after logs have been rotated and a dvd has been written. syslogd
stops writing output, then everything that does schedule_timeout() hangs,
the process table fills, and everything grinds to a halt.

If the problem is detected early enough, syslogd can be manually killed
and restarted, unwedging everything and returning everything to normal
operation.

I'm running 2.6.10-rc3, compiled with smp. I've been seeing this since at
least 2.6.8.1, both smp and nosmp. userspace is debian testing.

sysrq+t output from three hangs in November with 2.6.9 is at
http://hashbrown.cts.ucla.edu/deadlock/.

A gdb backtrace for syslogd from the latest hang shows

#0 0xb7f937a1 in pthread_setcanceltype () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#1 0xb7fe4ae0 in _obstack () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#2 0xb7fe1fcc in ?? () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#3 0x0804f8dc in optind ()
#4 0xb7f41cbf in tzset () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#5 0x0804f820 in optind ()
#6 0x00000014 in ?? ()
#7 0x0804d2bc in _IO_stdin_used ()
#8 0xbfffec28 in ?? ()
#9 0x00000006 in ?? ()
#10 0x0804a8e8 in ?? ()
#11 0xb7fe1fcc in ?? () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#12 0x0000000c in ?? ()
#13 0x00000001 in ?? ()
#14 0x0000000c in ?? ()
#15 0xb7f400a1 in localtime () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#16 0x0804f8dc in optind ()
#17 0x00000001 in ?? ()
#18 0xb7fe4ae0 in _obstack () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#19 0x0000000a in ?? ()
#20 0xb7f3ff3f in ctime () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#21 0x0804f8dc in optind ()
#22 0x0804acfa in ?? ()
#23 0x0804f8dc in optind ()
#24 0x0804f820 in optind ()
#25 0x0000000c in ?? ()
#26 0x0804f900 in optind ()
#27 0x0804d393 in _IO_stdin_used ()
#28 0x00000000 in ?? ()
#29 0x00000000 in ?? ()
#30 0x00000000 in ?? ()
#31 0x0000000a in ?? ()
#32 0x00000000 in ?? ()
#33 0x00000000 in ?? ()
#34 0x0804f900 in optind ()
#35 0x0000000c in ?? ()
#36 0x00000001 in ?? ()
#37 0x00000000 in ?? ()
#38 0x0804b996 in ?? ()
#39 0x00000006 in ?? ()
#40 0x0804d393 in _IO_stdin_used ()
#41 0x0804f900 in optind ()
#42 0x0000000c in ?? ()
#43 0x00000000 in ?? ()
#44 0xb7fe1fcc in ?? () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#45 0xb7fe4ae0 in _obstack () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#46 <signal handler called>
#47 0xb7f41881 in tzset () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6



I can't repeat this at will, but it does seem to happen fairly frequently.
How do I tell if this is a kernel problem or a userspace issue? Is there
anything I should look for to figure out why syslogd is causing everything
else to block?


-Chris

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 10:17:57 -0800 (PST)
From: Chris Stromsoe <cbs@cts.ucla.edu>
To: linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
Subject: Re: deadlock also with 2.6.9 nosmp, and 2.6.10-rc1 nosmp,
was Re: deadlock with 2.6.9

I managed to get access to the system while it was exhibiting the problem.
There are two cron processes both in D state. I was not able to attach to
either process with gdb. /proc/pid/wchan showed do_fork for both processes.

I was able to 'killall -9 cron' and kill all of the cron tasks.

I had several other processes that /proc/pid/wchan showed in unix_wait_for_peer
(sshd), futex_wait (syslogd), and do_exit (zombie sshd).

When I killed syslogd, the zombie sshd processes disappeared and everything
started magically working again.


-Chris

On Fri, 19 Nov 2004, Chris Stromsoe wrote:

> I am still seeing this with 2.6.9 nosmp and with 2.6.10-rc1 nosmp. The
> symptoms are the same. Every so often, things stop forking. sysrq+t shows
> almost every running process in schedule_timeout. It seems to happen every
> few days.
>
> The system is a syslog collector for >100 devices that log everything at
> debug level. Every 3 or 4 days (twice a week) it writes all of the logs to
> dvd using growisofs.
>
> Every few days -- maybe 3 or 4, but not tied in any way that I can see to the
> dvd writing -- the system becomes unresponsive; nothing forks. I can use
> sysrq+e and sysrq+i to kill everything and then regain console access and
> restart everything through /etc/rc*.d/* manually. Life continues on until
> the next hang.
>
> I have had the same problem with 2.6.8.1 smp, 2.6.9 smp, 2.6.9 smp booted
> with nosmp, and now 2.6.10-rc1 smp booted with nosmp.
>
> I'm not sure where to look next. This is fairly reproducible; it just takes
> a few days.
>
>
> -Chris
>
>
> On Sat, 6 Nov 2004, Chris Stromsoe wrote:
>
>> I had a third lockup, this time not related to burning a dvd. As before,
>> the bulk of the processes that were hung were cron, and looked like:
>>
>> cron S C1205F60 0 5023 444 5036 5022 (NOTLB)
>> c721ec9c 00000082 cd1b27f0 c1205f60 ca82ab7c c252a97c c721ec94 c014584e
>> c252a940 c1fe8900 b7fe7000 ce607150 c1205f60 00239d5b fac8e72b
>> 00003496
>> cd1b2950 cf9b1d40 7fffffff 00000001 c721ecd8 c02f9f04 b7fe7000
>> 00000001
>> Call Trace:
>> [<c02f9f04>] schedule_timeout+0xb4/0xc0
>> [<c02ef86e>] unix_wait_for_peer+0xbe/0xd0
>> [<c02f028a>] unix_dgram_sendmsg+0x26a/0x500
>> [<c0293cab>] sock_sendmsg+0xbb/0xe0
>> [<c0295161>] sys_sendto+0xe1/0x100
>> [<c02951b2>] sys_send+0x32/0x40
>> [<c0295a1a>] sys_socketcall+0x13a/0x250
>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>
>>
>> Full sysrq+t dump is at <http://hashbrown.cts.ucla.edu/deadlock/>.
>>
>>
>> Several others that were in the same state:
>>
>> sendmail-mta S C1205F60 0 416 1 434 334 (NOTLB)
>> ceaaceac 00000082 00000000 c1205f60 c12068c0 ceaacf44 ceaace84 c0139bb5
>> cfba6b80 00000246 ceaaceac c01236d6 c1205f60 00005a1e cb12fa34
>> 0000acdf
>> ce9f97f0 0b4fcb33 ceaacec0 00000007 ceaacee8 c02f9eb5 ceaacec0
>> 0b4fcb33
>> Call Trace:
>> [<c02f9eb5>] schedule_timeout+0x65/0xc0
>> [<c01671ee>] do_select+0x16e/0x2a0
>> [<c016760e>] sys_select+0x2ae/0x4c0
>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>
>>
>> ntpd S C1205F60 0 434 1 437 416 (NOTLB)
>> cf7e1eac 00000086 00000000 c1205f60 c12068c0 00000010 c034eb80 00000000
>> cfba6700 bffffa10 000000d0 cfb1a2e0 c1205f60 000008d0 0c7e1cd2
>> 0000ace0
>> ce9f87d0 00000000 7fffffff 00000008 cf7e1ee8 c02f9f04 00000246
>> cf7e1ed0
>> Call Trace:
>> [<c02f9f04>] schedule_timeout+0xb4/0xc0
>> [<c01671ee>] do_select+0x16e/0x2a0
>> [<c016760e>] sys_select+0x2ae/0x4c0
>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>
>>
>> mdadm S C1205F60 0 437 1 440 434 (NOTLB)
>> cf707eac 00000086 00000000 c1205f60 c12068c0 cfb3c610 00000003 00000000
>> cf8204c0 00000246 cf707eac c01236d6 c1205f60 00000448 b1f651f9
>> 0000acd3
>> cfb3d790 0b4fd705 cf707ec0 00000005 cf707ee8 c02f9eb5 cf707ec0
>> 0b4fd705
>> Call Trace:
>> [<c02f9eb5>] schedule_timeout+0x65/0xc0
>> [<c01671ee>] do_select+0x16e/0x2a0
>> [<c016760e>] sys_select+0x2ae/0x4c0
>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>
>>
>>
>> atd S C1205F60 0 440 1 444 437 (NOTLB)
>> ce5e0f48 00000082 00000000 c1205f60 c12068c0 00000000 00000000 00000000
>> cfba6280 00000246 ce5e0f48 c01236d6 c1205f60 00006970 daf6df4d
>> 0000aa54
>> ce9f8270 0b5bfcbc ce5e0f5c 000f41a7 ce5e0f84 c02f9eb5 ce5e0f5c
>> 0b5bfcbc
>> Call Trace:
>> [<c02f9eb5>] schedule_timeout+0x65/0xc0
>> [<c01243ce>] sys_nanosleep+0xde/0x160
>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>
>>
>>
>> The box is P3 SMP, 256Mb ram, dual Intel eepro100 controllers, bonded into a
>> single failover device. The box is a syslog server for ~100 different other
>> machines logging at debug level. UDP traffic is constant. syslog logs to a
>> stripe of two mirrors, built with mdadm.
>>
>> Each of the three hangs has been exactly the same. Nothing forks, but I can
>> use sysrq to dump the process table, or to kill everything, log in, and
>> restart.
>>
>> After I logged in today, all of the partitions were mounted ro, and one of
>> the mirrors had kicked a partition out. Tests on the partition and the disk
>> that it's on so far show no errors.
>>
>> What would cause everything on the box to hang in schedule_timeout?
>>
>>
>> -Chris
>>
>> On Thu, 4 Nov 2004, Chris Stromsoe wrote:
>>
>>> I had another deadlock after the completion of a dvd writing session last
>>> night. The dvd was written using the ide interface with growisof.
>>>
>>> sysrq+p, sysrq+m, and a partial sysrq+t are at
>>> http://hashbrown.cts.ucla.edu/deadlock/sysrq+t-20041104.
>>>
>>> Virtually everything is stuck in schedule_timeout+0xb4/0xc0. It looks very
>>> similar to the last deadlock I had (sysrq+t output is in the same directory
>>> as the above as sysrq+t-20041101).
>>>
>>> cbs:~ > lsmod
>>> Module Size Used by
>>> ide_cd 39328 0
>>> cdrom 38460 1 ide_cd
>>> e100 29760 0
>>> bonding 64552 0
>>>
>>> Any ideas? Anything in particular to check?
>>>
>>>
>>> -Chris
>>>
>>> On Mon, 1 Nov 2004, Chris Stromsoe wrote:
>>>
>>>> The machine collects remote syslog, roughly 1000 packets per second. The
>>>> logs are burned to dvd several times per week. The hanging may have
>>>> coincided with the completion of one of the log burning sessions. Before
>>>> the last crash I was using ide-scsi to do the burning. Since the last
>>>> crash, I switched over to directly using the ide device and have disabled
>>>> ide-scsi.
>>>>
>>>> The machine did not crash. Remote access with ssh would hang after
>>>> authentication. Already running processes that didn't fork anything
>>>> responded fine to the network. I could not fork a shell from a serial
>>>> console. I was able to use sysrq to pull debugging information. I was
>>>> also able to kill off all running processes (sysrq+e and sysrq+i), then
>>>> log in from the serial console and restart things.
>>>>
>>>> I had the same problem with 2.6.8.1
>>>>
>>>> Most of the processes seem to be stuck in schedule_timeout.
>>>>
>>>> The full sysrq and .config are at http://hashbrown.cts.ucla.edu/deadlock/
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> cbs:~ > lsmod
>>>> Module Size Used by
>>>> sg 35040 0
>>>> sr_mod 14884 0
>>>> cdrom 38460 1 sr_mod
>>>> ide_scsi 15332 0
>>>> e100 29760 0
>>>> bonding 64552 0
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> telnet> send brk
>>>> SysRq : Show Regs
>>>>
>>>> Pid: 0, comm: swapper
>>>> EIP: 0060:[<c01022cf>] CPU: 0
>>>> EIP is at default_idle+0x2f/0x40
>>>> EFLAGS: 00000246 Not tainted (2.6.9)
>>>> EAX: 00000000 EBX: c039b000 ECX: c01022a0 EDX: c039b000
>>>> ESI: c04080a0 EDI: c04081a0 EBP: c039bfc4 DS: 007b ES: 007b
>>>> CR0: 8005003b CR2: bffffd66 CR3: 0fb3f000 CR4: 000006d0
>>>> [<c0102516>] show_regs+0x146/0x170
>>>> [<c0207a81>] __handle_sysrq+0x71/0xf0
>>>> [<c021a5aa>] receive_chars+0x11a/0x230
>>>> [<c021a9bd>] serial8250_interrupt+0xdd/0xe0
>>>> [<c0106c96>] handle_IRQ_event+0x36/0x70
>>>> [<c0107063>] do_IRQ+0xe3/0x1b0
>>>> [<c0104cf0>] common_interrupt+0x18/0x20
>>>> [<c010235b>] cpu_idle+0x3b/0x50
>>>> [<c039cb8b>] start_kernel+0x16b/0x190
>>>> [<c0100211>] 0xc0100211
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> telnet> send brk
>>>> SysRq : Show Memory
>>>> Mem-info:
>>>> DMA per-cpu:
>>>> cpu 0 hot: low 2, high 6, batch 1
>>>> cpu 0 cold: low 0, high 2, batch 1
>>>> Normal per-cpu:
>>>> cpu 0 hot: low 30, high 90, batch 15
>>>> cpu 0 cold: low 0, high 30, batch 15
>>>> HighMem per-cpu: empty
>>>>
>>>> Free pages: 1348kB (0kB HighMem)
>>>> Active:26008 inactive:2118 dirty:10 writeback:0 unstable:0 free:337
>>>> slab:16168 mapped:25917 pagetables:12564
>>>> DMA free:172kB min:32kB low:64kB high:96kB active:160kB inactive:48kB
>>>> present:16384kB
>>>> protections[]: 0 0 0
>>>> Normal free:1176kB min:480kB low:960kB high:1440kB active:103872kB
>>>> inactive:8424kB present:245760kB
>>>> protections[]: 0 0 0
>>>> HighMem free:0kB min:128kB low:256kB high:384kB active:0kB inactive:0kB
>>>> present:0kB
>>>> protections[]: 0 0 0
>>>> DMA: 23*4kB 2*8kB 0*16kB 0*32kB 1*64kB 0*128kB 0*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB
>>>> 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = 172kB
>>>> Normal: 54*4kB 8*8kB 14*16kB 5*32kB 2*64kB 1*128kB 1*256kB 0*512kB
>>>> 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = 1176kB
>>>> HighMem: empty
>>>> Swap cache: add 66873, delete 65915, find 54916/55208, race 0+0
>>>> Free swap: 805560kB
>>>> 65536 pages of RAM
>>>> 0 pages of HIGHMEM
>>>> 1786 reserved pages
>>>> 600111 pages shared
>>>> 958 pages swap cached
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> cron S C1205F60 0 2614 435 2628 2613 (NOTLB)
>>>> cde0bc9c 00000082 00000000 c1205f60 c12068c0 c4dba97c cde0bc94 c014584e
>>>> c4dba940 c57d3468 b7fe7000 00000001 c1205f60 001aff4a d6c5bd65
>>>> 0003d278
>>>> c8c5e530 cf9aed40 7fffffff 00000001 cde0bcd8 c02f9f04 b7fe7000
>>>> 00000001
>>>> Call Trace:
>>>> [<c02f9f04>] schedule_timeout+0xb4/0xc0
>>>> [<c02ef86e>] unix_wait_for_peer+0xbe/0xd0
>>>> [<c02f028a>] unix_dgram_sendmsg+0x26a/0x500
>>>> [<c0293cab>] sock_sendmsg+0xbb/0xe0
>>>> [<c0295161>] sys_sendto+0xe1/0x100
>>>> [<c02951b2>] sys_send+0x32/0x40
>>>> [<c0295a1a>] sys_socketcall+0x13a/0x250
>>>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>>> cron S C1205F60 0 2628 435 2640 2614 (NOTLB)
>>>> cc738c9c 00000086 c8c5e930 c1205f60 c82e1b7c c4dba73c cc738c94 00000000
>>>> c4dba700 00000007 cc738cac cebb0690 c1205f60 00289ad9 af39036a
>>>> 0003d2be
>>>> c8c5ea90 cf9aed40 7fffffff 00000001 cc738cd8 c02f9f04 00000246
>>>> 000000d0
>>>> Call Trace:
>>>> [<c02f9f04>] schedule_timeout+0xb4/0xc0
>>>> [<c02ef86e>] unix_wait_for_peer+0xbe/0xd0
>>>> [<c02f028a>] unix_dgram_sendmsg+0x26a/0x500
>>>> [<c0293cab>] sock_sendmsg+0xbb/0xe0
>>>> [<c0295161>] sys_sendto+0xe1/0x100
>>>> [<c02951b2>] sys_send+0x32/0x40
>>>> [<c0295a1a>] sys_socketcall+0x13a/0x250
>>>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>>>
>>>> cron S C1205F60 0 2640 435 2655 2628 (NOTLB)
>>>> c2bfbc9c 00000082 c721b9d0 c1205f60 cd21db7c c4dba07c c2bfbc94 00000000
>>>> c4dba040 00000007 cf06b200 cebb0690 c1205f60 0027ced4 87b993a6
>>>> 0003d304
>>>> c721bb30 cf9aed40 7fffffff 00000001 c2bfbcd8 c02f9f04 c138f6c0
>>>> c9bdea4c
>>>> Call Trace:
>>>> [<c02f9f04>] schedule_timeout+0xb4/0xc0
>>>> [<c02ef86e>] unix_wait_for_peer+0xbe/0xd0
>>>> [<c02f028a>] unix_dgram_sendmsg+0x26a/0x500
>>>> [<c0293cab>] sock_sendmsg+0xbb/0xe0
>>>> [<c0295161>] sys_sendto+0xe1/0x100
>>>> [<c02951b2>] sys_send+0x32/0x40
>>>> [<c0295a1a>] sys_socketcall+0x13a/0x250
>>>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>>> sshd S C1205F60 0 2653 1410 2654 17528 (NOTLB)
>>>> c163dc9c 00000086 c721b470 c1205f60 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
>>>> c4dba4c0 00000007 cf06b560 c721af10 c1205f60 00039ddd 67910d34
>>>> 0003d32a
>>>> c721b5d0 cf9aed40 7fffffff 00000001 c163dcd8 c02f9f04 c138f6c0
>>>> c9bdea4c
>>>> Call Trace:
>>>> [<c02f9f04>] schedule_timeout+0xb4/0xc0
>>>> [<c02ef86e>] unix_wait_for_peer+0xbe/0xd0
>>>> [<c02f028a>] unix_dgram_sendmsg+0x26a/0x500
>>>> [<c0293cab>] sock_sendmsg+0xbb/0xe0
>>>> [<c0295161>] sys_sendto+0xe1/0x100
>>>> [<c02951b2>] sys_send+0x32/0x40
>>>> [<c0295a1a>] sys_socketcall+0x13a/0x250
>>>> [<c0104383>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -Chris
>>>> -
>>>> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
>>>> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
>>>> More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
>>>> Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
>>>>
>>> -
>>> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
>>> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
>>> More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
>>> Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
>>>
>> -
>> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
>> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
>> More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
>> Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
>>
> -
> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
> More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
> Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
>
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 14:08    [W:0.073 / U:0.856 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site