lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2003]   [Jul]   [10]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] Fix do_div() for all architectures
On Thu, Jul 10, 2003 at 09:31:45PM +0200, Bernardo Innocenti wrote:
> On Thursday 10 July 2003 18:39, Richard Henderson wrote:
>
> > On Thu, Jul 10, 2003 at 06:18:59PM +0200, Andrea Arcangeli wrote:
> > > On Thu, Jul 10, 2003 at 08:40:19AM -0700, Richard Henderson wrote:
> > > > On Tue, Jul 08, 2003 at 08:27:26PM +0200, Bernardo Innocenti wrote:
> > > > > +extern uint32_t __div64_32(uint64_t *dividend, uint32_t
> > > > > divisor) __attribute_pure__;
> > > >
> > > > ...
> > > >
> > > > > + __rem = __div64_32(&(n), __base); \
> > > >
> > > > The pure declaration is very incorrect. You're writing to N.
> > >
> > > now pure sounds more reasonable, I wondered how could gcc keep track
> > > of the stuff pointed by the parameters (especially if this stuff
> > > points to other stuff etc.. ;).
>
> The compiler could easily tell what memory can be clobbered by a pointer
> by applying type-based aliasing rules. For example, a function taking a
> "char *" can't clobber memory objects declared as "long bar" or
> "struct foo".
>
> Without type based alias analysis, the compiler is forced to flush
> all registers containing copies of memory objects before function
> call and reloading values from memory afterwards.

the kernel isn't complaint with the alias analysis, that's why it has to
be turned off (-fnostrict-aliasing) or stuff would break.

> Boy, that's ugly! It's too bad C can't do it the Perl way:
>
> (n,rem) = __div64_32(n, base);

or the python way:

n, rem = __div64_32(n, base)

;)

Andrea
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:46    [W:0.083 / U:19.268 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site