lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2003]   [Apr]   [30]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
    /
    Date
    From
    SubjectRe: Why DRM exists [was Re: Flame Linus to a crisp!]
    On Wed, Apr 30, 2003 at 10:53:52AM -0600, Dax Kelson wrote:
    > On Wed, 30 Apr 2003, Larry McVoy wrote:
    >
    > > Your post shows that you think that the reaction is bad and you even say
    > > that the reaction is likely. You vigourously disagree with my conclusions
    > > as to why the reaction is happening, I see that. OK, so let's try it
    > > with a question rather than a statement: why are things like the DMCA and
    > > DRM happening? It isn't the open source guys pushing those, obviously,
    > > it's the corporations. So why are they doing it?
    >
    > DRM/DMCA do nothing to address reimplementation (it can't, see all
    > previous posts on how it is a LEGAL activity).
    >
    > In my observation, DRM/DMCA addresses unauthorized audio and video content
    > copying.
    >
    > So, if Open Source is all about reimplementation, and DRM/DMCA is about
    > "protecting" audio/video content, where is the connection?

    "Trusted Computing/Palladium" stuff is clearly headed in the direction
    of encrypting everything, the only place it lands unencrypted is on
    your display. I thought that fell under the heading of DRM but maybe
    I'm mistaken.

    I believe the point of that is "huh, people are going to copy our program?
    OK, well, we're a monopoly, you have use our programs to generate the
    data, we encrypt the data and poof! the reimplemented programs are
    worthless".

    That line of reasoning, by the way, only works if they are a monopoly,
    i.e., it doesn't work real well for BK, there are lots of other source
    management systems. But it works very well for things like Word,
    that's a de facto standard, contrary to what some people here believe
    it is bloody difficult to negotiate a contract in anything but Word.
    Try sending a lawyer anything else and you'll see what I mean.

    So I don't agree that the DRM stuff is all about protecting audio/video
    content at all, I think it goes much further than that. Maybe I'm
    wrong, maybe DRM isn't all about that, but the point remains that there
    is lots of activity in the directions I'm describing and whether it
    falls under DRM, DMCA, Trusted Computing, Palladium, of BuzzWord2000,
    the activity exists. And I think it exists at least in part because
    of the threat of the open source reimplementations. I'm starting to
    think I'm the only person on this list who thinks that, that may be,
    but in the business world that I move in pretty much everyone thinks that.

    The open source thing is a new twist, it's changing the playing field.
    That can be good (it has been so far) but it can be bad too if the
    corporations get all paranoid, which is what they look like to me.

    What you do about it is an open question. My thought has been to focus
    on creating new stuff that creates its own world of users and advocates.
    Going back to Word, if there was a word processing system that was better
    than Word and people switched to it, then any attempt by Microsoft to lock
    up the data is irrelevant. Apply that pattern to any application which
    operates on data - if you let any corporation have the best technology and
    become a monopoly then they can lock up the data and you're shut out of
    the game. That's one of the reasons I sort of think the BK clone attempts
    are pointless, we can change the file format or encrypt it and unless
    there is some other compelling reason to use the clone, it's irrelevant.
    On the other hand, make something different and better and BK becomes
    irrelevant (unless we do leapfrog with some new feature/whatever).

    That's what I meant by chasing. If you are chasing the leader you are
    automatically more at risk because you are trying to play in the leader's
    playing field and they can change the rules to screw you up. You build
    a better playing field and you turn the tables, now the leader is the
    follower and they have to play by your rules.
    --
    ---
    Larry McVoy lm at bitmover.com http://www.bitmover.com/lm
    -
    To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
    the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
    More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
    Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

    \
     
     \ /
      Last update: 2005-03-22 13:35    [W:0.029 / U:181.616 seconds]
    ©2003-2016 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site