lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2003]   [Feb]   [25]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] eliminate warnings in generated module files
Date
In message <Pine.LNX.4.44.0302251930280.13501-100000@chaos.physics.uiowa.edu> y
ou write:
> FWIW, I think it's not a good idea. Why call it 'required' in the kernel
> when the normal (gcc) expression for it is 'used'. - We didn't rename
> 'deprecated' to 'obsolete', either ;)

But deprecated was a fine name. "used" is a terrible name, and since
we're renaming it via a macro anyway... (see "likey").

> Also, I don't really see any use for __optional at this point, so why add
> it at all?

From ip_conntrack_core.c:

#ifdef CONFIG_SYSCTL
static struct ctl_table_header *ip_conntrack_sysctl_header;

static ctl_table ip_conntrack_table[] = {
{
.ctl_name = NET_IP_CONNTRACK_MAX,
.procname = NET_IP_CONNTRACK_MAX_NAME,
.data = &ip_conntrack_max,
.maxlen = sizeof(ip_conntrack_max),
.mode = 0644,
.proc_handler = proc_dointvec
},
{ .ctl_name = 0 }
};

static ctl_table ip_conntrack_dir_table[] = {
{
.ctl_name = NET_IPV4,
.procname = "ipv4",
.maxlen = 0,
.mode = 0555,
.child = ip_conntrack_table
},
{ .ctl_name = 0 }
};

static ctl_table ip_conntrack_root_table[] = {
{
.ctl_name = CTL_NET,
.procname = "net",
.maxlen = 0,
.mode = 0555,
.child = ip_conntrack_dir_table
},
{ .ctl_name = 0 }
};
#endif /*CONFIG_SYSCTL*/

I'd love to frop the #ifdef and just mark them __optional: before that
would just mean bloat, but when gcc 3.3 rolls in, they should vanish
nicely.

There are numerous other examples...
Rusty.
--
Anyone who quotes me in their sig is an idiot. -- Rusty Russell.
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:33    [W:0.652 / U:0.324 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site