lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2003]   [Jan]   [2]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
From
Date
Subject[unify netdev config 12/22] arch-sparc32
diff -urN a/arch/sparc/Kconfig b/arch/sparc/Kconfig
--- a/arch/sparc/Kconfig 2002-12-16 07:01:46.000000000 +0100
+++ b/arch/sparc/Kconfig 2003-01-02 15:36:52.000000000 +0100
@@ -883,396 +883,6 @@

source "net/Kconfig"

-
-menu "Network device support"
- depends on NET
-
-config NETDEVICES
- bool "Network device support"
- ---help---
- You can say N here if you don't intend to connect your Linux box to
- any other computer at all or if all your connections will be over a
- telephone line with a modem either via UUCP (UUCP is a protocol to
- forward mail and news between unix hosts over telephone lines; read
- the UUCP-HOWTO, available from
- <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto>) or dialing up a shell
- account or a BBS, even using term (term is a program which gives you
- almost full Internet connectivity if you have a regular dial up
- shell account on some Internet connected Unix computer. Read
- <http://www.bart.nl/~patrickr/term-howto/Term-HOWTO.html>).
-
- You'll have to say Y if your computer contains a network card that
- you want to use under Linux (make sure you know its name because you
- will be asked for it and read the Ethernet-HOWTO (especially if you
- plan to use more than one network card under Linux)) or if you want
- to use SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol is the protocol used to
- send Internet traffic over telephone lines or null modem cables) or
- CSLIP (compressed SLIP) or PPP (Point to Point Protocol, a better
- and newer replacement for SLIP) or PLIP (Parallel Line Internet
- Protocol is mainly used to create a mini network by connecting the
- parallel ports of two local machines) or AX.25/KISS (protocol for
- sending Internet traffic over amateur radio links).
-
- Make sure to read the NET-3-HOWTO. Eventually, you will have to read
- Olaf Kirch's excellent and free book "Network Administrator's
- Guide", to be found in <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#guide>. If
- unsure, say Y.
-
-config DUMMY
- tristate "Dummy net driver support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- ---help---
- This is essentially a bit-bucket device (i.e. traffic you send to
- this device is consigned into oblivion) with a configurable IP
- address. It is most commonly used in order to make your currently
- inactive SLIP address seem like a real address for local programs.
- If you use SLIP or PPP, you might want to say Y here. Since this
- thing often comes in handy, the default is Y. It won't enlarge your
- kernel either. What a deal. Read about it in the Network
- Administrator's Guide, available from
- <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#guide>.
-
- If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
- say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
- will be called dummy.o. If you want to use more than one dummy
- device at a time, you need to compile this driver as a module.
- Instead of 'dummy', the devices will then be called 'dummy0',
- 'dummy1' etc.
-
-config BONDING
- tristate "Bonding driver support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- ---help---
- Say 'Y' or 'M' if you wish to be able to 'bond' multiple Ethernet
- Channels together. This is called 'Etherchannel' by Cisco,
- 'Trunking' by Sun, and 'Bonding' in Linux.
-
- If you have two Ethernet connections to some other computer, you can
- make them behave like one double speed connection using this driver.
- Naturally, this has to be supported at the other end as well, either
- with a similar Bonding Linux driver, a Cisco 5500 switch or a
- SunTrunking SunSoft driver.
-
- This is similar to the EQL driver, but it merges Ethernet segments
- instead of serial lines.
-
- If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
- say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
- will be called bonding.o.
-
-config TUN
- tristate "Universal TUN/TAP device driver support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- ---help---
- TUN/TAP provides packet reception and transmission for user space
- programs. It can be viewed as a simple Point-to-Point or Ethernet
- device, which instead of receiving packets from a physical media,
- receives them from user space program and instead of sending packets
- via physical media writes them to the user space program.
-
- When a program opens /dev/net/tun, driver creates and registers
- corresponding net device tunX or tapX. After a program closed above
- devices, driver will automatically delete tunXX or tapXX device and
- all routes corresponding to it.
-
- Please read <file:Documentation/networking/tuntap.txt> for more
- information.
-
- This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
- The module will be called tun.o. If you want to compile it as a
- module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
- If you don't know what to use this for, you don't need it.
-
-config ETHERTAP
- tristate "Ethertap network tap (OBSOLETE)"
- depends on NETDEVICES && EXPERIMENTAL && NETLINK
- ---help---
- If you say Y here (and have said Y to "Kernel/User network link
- driver", above) and create a character special file /dev/tap0 with
- major number 36 and minor number 16 using mknod ("man mknod"), you
- will be able to have a user space program read and write raw
- Ethernet frames from/to that special file. tap0 can be configured
- with ifconfig and route like any other Ethernet device but it is not
- connected to any physical LAN; everything written by the user to
- /dev/tap0 is treated by the kernel as if it had come in from a LAN
- to the device tap0; everything the kernel wants to send out over the
- device tap0 can instead be read by the user from /dev/tap0: the user
- mode program replaces the LAN that would be attached to an ordinary
- Ethernet device. Please read the file
- <file:Documentation/networking/ethertap.txt> for more information.
-
- This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
- The module will be called ethertap.o. If you want to compile it as a
- module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
- If you don't know what to use this for, you don't need it.
-
-config PPP
- tristate "PPP (point-to-point protocol) support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- ---help---
- PPP (Point to Point Protocol) is a newer and better SLIP. It serves
- the same purpose: sending Internet traffic over telephone (and other
- serial) lines. Ask your access provider if they support it, because
- otherwise you can't use it; most Internet access providers these
- days support PPP rather than SLIP.
-
- To use PPP, you need an additional program called pppd as described
- in the PPP-HOWTO, available at
- <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto>. Make sure that you have
- the version of pppd recommended in <file:Documentation/Changes>.
- The PPP option enlarges your kernel by about 16 KB.
-
- There are actually two versions of PPP: the traditional PPP for
- asynchronous lines, such as regular analog phone lines, and
- synchronous PPP which can be used over digital ISDN lines for
- example. If you want to use PPP over phone lines or other
- asynchronous serial lines, you need to say Y (or M) here and also to
- the next option, "PPP support for async serial ports". For PPP over
- synchronous lines, you should say Y (or M) here and to "Support
- synchronous PPP", below.
-
- This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
- If you said Y to "Version information on all symbols" above, then
- you cannot compile the PPP driver into the kernel; you can then only
- compile it as a module. The module will be called ppp_generic.o.
- If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
- <file:Documentation/modules.txt> as well as
- <file:Documentation/networking/net-modules.txt>.
-
-config PPP_ASYNC
- tristate "PPP support for async serial ports"
- depends on PPP
- ---help---
- Say Y (or M) here if you want to be able to use PPP over standard
- asynchronous serial ports, such as COM1 or COM2 on a PC. If you use
- a modem (not a synchronous or ISDN modem) to contact your ISP, you
- need this option.
-
- This code is also available as a module (code which can be inserted
- into and removed from the running kernel). If you want to compile
- it as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
- If unsure, say Y.
-
-config PPP_SYNC_TTY
- tristate "PPP support for sync tty ports"
- depends on PPP
- help
- Say Y (or M) here if you want to be able to use PPP over synchronous
- (HDLC) tty devices, such as the SyncLink adapter. These devices
- are often used for high-speed leased lines like T1/E1.
-
- This code is also available as a module (code which can be inserted
- into and removed from the running kernel). If you want to compile
- it as a module, say M here and read
- <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
-config PPP_DEFLATE
- tristate "PPP Deflate compression"
- depends on PPP
- ---help---
- Support for the Deflate compression method for PPP, which uses the
- Deflate algorithm (the same algorithm that gzip uses) to compress
- each PPP packet before it is sent over the wire. The machine at the
- other end of the PPP link (usually your ISP) has to support the
- Deflate compression method as well for this to be useful. Even if
- they don't support it, it is safe to say Y here.
-
- This code is also available as a module (code which can be inserted
- into and removed from the running kernel). If you want to compile
- it as a module, say M here and read
- <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
-config PPP_BSDCOMP
- tristate "PPP BSD-Compress compression"
- depends on NETDEVICES && PPP!=n && m
- ---help---
- Support for the BSD-Compress compression method for PPP, which uses
- the LZW compression method to compress each PPP packet before it is
- sent over the wire. The machine at the other end of the PPP link
- (usually your ISP) has to support the BSD-Compress compression
- method as well for this to be useful. Even if they don't support it,
- it is safe to say Y here.
-
- The PPP Deflate compression method ("PPP Deflate compression",
- above) is preferable to BSD-Compress, because it compresses better
- and is patent-free.
-
- Note that the BSD compression code will always be compiled as a
- module; it is called bsd_comp.o and will show up in the directory
- modules once you have said "make modules". If unsure, say N.
-
-config SLIP
- tristate "SLIP (serial line) support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- ---help---
- Say Y if you intend to use SLIP or CSLIP (compressed SLIP) to
- connect to your Internet service provider or to connect to some
- other local Unix box or if you want to configure your Linux box as a
- Slip/CSlip server for other people to dial in. SLIP (Serial Line
- Internet Protocol) is a protocol used to send Internet traffic over
- serial connections such as telephone lines or null modem cables;
- nowadays, the protocol PPP is more commonly used for this same
- purpose.
-
- Normally, your access provider has to support SLIP in order for you
- to be able to use it, but there is now a SLIP emulator called SLiRP
- around (available from
- <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/network/serial/>) which
- allows you to use SLIP over a regular dial up shell connection. If
- you plan to use SLiRP, make sure to say Y to CSLIP, below. The
- NET-3-HOWTO, available from
- <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto>, explains how to
- configure SLIP. Note that you don't need this option if you just
- want to run term (term is a program which gives you almost full
- Internet connectivity if you have a regular dial up shell account on
- some Internet connected Unix computer. Read
- <http://www.bart.nl/~patrickr/term-howto/Term-HOWTO.html>). SLIP
- support will enlarge your kernel by about 4 KB. If unsure, say N.
-
- If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
- say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> as well as
- <file:Documentation/networking/net-modules.txt>. The module will be
- called slip.o.
-
-config SLIP_COMPRESSED
- bool "CSLIP compressed headers"
- depends on SLIP
- ---help---
- This protocol is faster than SLIP because it uses compression on the
- TCP/IP headers (not on the data itself), but it has to be supported
- on both ends. Ask your access provider if you are not sure and
- answer Y, just in case. You will still be able to use plain SLIP. If
- you plan to use SLiRP, the SLIP emulator (available from
- <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/network/serial/>) which
- allows you to use SLIP over a regular dial up shell connection, you
- definitely want to say Y here. The NET-3-HOWTO, available from
- <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto>, explains how to configure
- CSLIP. This won't enlarge your kernel.
-
-config SLIP_SMART
- bool "Keepalive and linefill"
- depends on SLIP
- help
- Adds additional capabilities to the SLIP driver to support the
- RELCOM line fill and keepalive monitoring. Ideal on poor quality
- analogue lines.
-
-config SLIP_MODE_SLIP6
- bool "Six bit SLIP encapsulation"
- depends on SLIP
- help
- Just occasionally you may need to run IP over hostile serial
- networks that don't pass all control characters or are only seven
- bit. Saying Y here adds an extra mode you can use with SLIP:
- "slip6". In this mode, SLIP will only send normal ASCII symbols over
- the serial device. Naturally, this has to be supported at the other
- end of the link as well. It's good enough, for example, to run IP
- over the async ports of a Camtec JNT Pad. If unsure, say N.
-
-config SUNLANCE
- tristate "Sun LANCE support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- help
- This driver supports the "le" interface present on all 32-bit Sparc
- systems, on some older Ultra systems and as an Sbus option. These
- cards are based on the AMD Lance chipset, which is better known
- via the NE2100 cards.
-
- This support is also available as a module called sunlance.o ( =
- code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
- whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
- here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
-config HAPPYMEAL
- tristate "Sun Happy Meal 10/100baseT support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- help
- This driver supports the "hme" interface present on most Ultra
- systems and as an option on older Sbus systems. This driver supports
- both PCI and Sbus devices. This driver also supports the "qfe" quad
- 100baseT device available in both PCI and Sbus configurations.
-
- This support is also available as a module called sunhme.o ( = code
- which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
- whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
- here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
-config SUNBMAC
- tristate "Sun BigMAC 10/100baseT support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
- depends on NETDEVICES && EXPERIMENTAL
- help
- This driver supports the "be" interface available as an Sbus option.
- This is Sun's older 100baseT Ethernet device.
-
- This support is also available as a module called sunbmac.o ( = code
- which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
- whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
- here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
-config SUNQE
- tristate "Sun QuadEthernet support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- help
- This driver supports the "qe" 10baseT Ethernet device, available as
- an Sbus option. Note that this is not the same as Quad FastEthernet
- "qfe" which is supported by the Happy Meal driver instead.
-
- This support is also available as a module called sunqe.o ( = code
- which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
- whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
- here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
-
-config MYRI_SBUS
- tristate "MyriCOM Gigabit Ethernet support"
- depends on NETDEVICES
- help
- This driver supports MyriCOM Sbus gigabit Ethernet cards.
-
- If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
- say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. This is
- recommended. The module will be called myri_sbus.o.
-
-config VORTEX
- tristate "3c590/3c900 series (592/595/597) \"Vortex/Boomerang\" support"
- depends on NETDEVICES && PCI
- ---help---
- This option enables driver support for a large number of 10mbps and
- 10/100mbps EISA, PCI and PCMCIA 3Com network cards:
-
- "Vortex" (Fast EtherLink 3c590/3c592/3c595/3c597) EISA and PCI
- "Boomerang" (EtherLink XL 3c900 or 3c905) PCI
- "Cyclone" (3c540/3c900/3c905/3c980/3c575/3c656) PCI and Cardbus
- "Tornado" (3c905) PCI
- "Hurricane" (3c555/3cSOHO) PCI
-
- If you have such a card, say Y and read the Ethernet-HOWTO,
- available from <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto>. More
- specific information is in
- <file:Documentation/networking/vortex.txt> and in the comments at
- the beginning of <file:drivers/net/3c59x.c>.
-
- If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
- inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
- say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> as well as
- <file:Documentation/networking/net-modules.txt>.
-
-# bool ' FDDI driver support' CONFIG_FDDI
-# if [ "$CONFIG_FDDI" = "y" ]; then
-# fi
-source "drivers/atm/Kconfig"
-
-endmenu
-
source "net/ax25/Kconfig"

# This one must be before the filesystem configs. -DaveM
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:32    [W:0.037 / U:0.072 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site