lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2002]   [Aug]   [18]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: Does Solaris really scale this well?
On Sat, 17 Aug 2002, Larry McVoy wrote:

> Date: Sat, 17 Aug 2002 17:55:17 -0700
> From: Larry McVoy <lm@bitmover.com>
> To: Ruth Ivimey-Cook <Ruth.Ivimey-Cook@ivimey.org>
> Cc: Matti Aarnio <matti.aarnio@zmailer.org>, Dax Kelson <dax@gurulabs.com>,
> "linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org" <linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org>
> Subject: Re: Does Solaris really scale this well?
>
> On Sun, Aug 18, 2002 at 12:03:24AM +0100, Ruth Ivimey-Cook wrote:
> > >> "When you take a 99-way UltraSPARC III machine and add a 100th processor,
> > >> you get 94 percent linear scalability. You can't get 94 percent linear
> > >> scalability on your first Intel chip. It's very, very hard to do, and they
> > >> have not done it."
> >
> > I've seen scientific reports of scalability that good in non-shared memory
> > computers (mostly in transputer arrays) where (with a scalable algorithm)
> > unless you got >90% you were doing something wrong. However, if you insist on
> > sharing main memory, I still don't believe you can get anywhere near that...
> > IMO 30% is doing very well once past the first few CPUs.
>
> Please reconsider your opinion. Both Sun and SGI scale past 100 CPUs on
> reasonable workloads in shared memory. Where "reasonable" != easy to do.


And where reasonable != 94%. Seriously, 94% scalability could be on a
8 CPUs 880, but, for example, I have a 64 CPUS domain on a E10k which is
far from 94% scalability (ok, an old E10k with an 83Mhz bus).
For what I saw, maybe SGI Origin 3000 is scaling
a little better with a lot of CPUS, but I also never had an E15000 around
for now...





-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:28    [W:0.077 / U:3.912 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site