lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2002]   [Aug]   [14]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH] Re: Some JBD documenation
From
On Wed, Aug 14, 2002 at 11:23:10PM +0100, roger wrote:
> Hi
>
> This patch is the JBD DocBook documentation patch which I

Of course it helps if I don't leave the patch in the
paperbag.


--
Roger.
Master of Peng Shui. (Ancient oriental art of Penguin Arranging)
GPG Key FPR: CFF1 F383 F854 4E6A 918D 5CFF A90D E73B 88DE 0B3E
# This is a BitKeeper generated patch for the following project:
# Project Name: Linux kernel tree
# This patch format is intended for GNU patch command version 2.5 or higher.
# This patch includes the following deltas:
# ChangeSet 1.744 -> 1.745
# fs/jbd/journal.c 1.5 -> 1.6
# fs/jbd/recovery.c 1.3 -> 1.4
# fs/jbd/transaction.c 1.4 -> 1.5
# Documentation/DocBook/Makefile 1.13 -> 1.14
# include/linux/jbd.h 1.5 -> 1.6
# (new) -> 1.1 Documentation/DocBook/journal-api.tmpl
#
# The following is the BitKeeper ChangeSet Log
# --------------------------------------------
# 02/08/14 roger@zuse.computer-surgery.co.uk 1.745
# Add DocBook style documentation for the jbd
# layers client api.
# --------------------------------------------
#
diff -Nru a/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile b/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile
--- a/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
+++ b/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
@@ -1,7 +1,8 @@
BOOKS := wanbook.sgml z8530book.sgml mcabook.sgml videobook.sgml \
kernel-api.sgml parportbook.sgml kernel-hacking.sgml \
kernel-locking.sgml via-audio.sgml mousedrivers.sgml sis900.sgml \
- deviceiobook.sgml procfs-guide.sgml tulip-user.sgml
+ deviceiobook.sgml procfs-guide.sgml tulip-user.sgml \
+ journal-api.sgml

PS := $(patsubst %.sgml, %.ps, $(BOOKS))
PDF := $(patsubst %.sgml, %.pdf, $(BOOKS))
@@ -137,6 +138,17 @@
parportbook.ps: $(EPS-parportbook)
parportbook.sgml: parportbook.tmpl $(TOPDIR)/drivers/parport/init.c
$(TOPDIR)/scripts/docgen $(TOPDIR)/drivers/parport/init.c <$< >$@
+
+
+JBDSOURCES := $(TOPDIR)/include/linux/jbd.h \
+ $(TOPDIR)/fs/jbd/journal.c \
+ $(TOPDIR)/fs/jbd/recovery.c \
+ $(TOPDIR)/fs/jbd/transaction.c
+
+journal-api.sgml: journal-api.tmpl $(JBDSOURCES)
+ $(TOPDIR)/scripts/docgen $(JBDSOURCES) \
+ <journal-api.tmpl >journal-api.sgml
+

DVI := $(patsubst %.sgml, %.dvi, $(BOOKS))
AUX := $(patsubst %.sgml, %.aux, $(BOOKS))
diff -Nru a/Documentation/DocBook/journal-api.tmpl b/Documentation/DocBook/journal-api.tmpl
--- /dev/null Wed Dec 31 16:00:00 1969
+++ b/Documentation/DocBook/journal-api.tmpl Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
@@ -0,0 +1,297 @@
+<!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook V3.1//EN"[]>
+<book id="LinuxJBDAPI">
+ <bookinfo>
+ <title>The Linux Journalling API</title>
+ <authorgroup>
+ <author>
+ <firstname>Roger</firstname>
+ <surname>Gammans</surname>
+ <affiliation>
+ <address>
+ <email>rgammans@computer-surgery.co.uk</email>
+ </address>
+ </affiliation>
+ </author>
+ </authorgroup>
+
+ <authorgroup>
+ <author>
+ <firstname>Stephen</firstname>
+ <surname>Tweedie</surname>
+ <affiliation>
+ <address>
+ <email>sct@redhat.com</email>
+ </address>
+ </affiliation>
+ </author>
+ </authorgroup>
+
+ <copyright>
+ <year>2002</year>
+ <holder>Roger Gammans</holder>
+ </copyright>
+
+<legalnotice>
+ <para>
+ This documentation is free software; you can redistribute
+ it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public
+ License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
+ version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later
+ version.
+ </para>
+
+ <para>
+ This program is distributed in the hope that it will be
+ useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied
+ warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
+ See the GNU General Public License for more details.
+ </para>
+
+ <para>
+ You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
+ License along with this program; if not, write to the Free
+ Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston,
+ MA 02111-1307 USA
+ </para>
+
+ <para>
+ For more details see the file COPYING in the source
+ distribution of Linux.
+ </para>
+ </legalnotice>
+ </bookinfo>
+
+<toc></toc>
+
+ <chapter id="Overview">
+ <title>Overview</title>
+ <sect1>
+ <title>Details</title>
+<para>
+The journalling layer is easy to use. You need to
+first of all create a journal_t data structure. There are
+two calls to do this dependent on how you decide to allocate the physical
+media on which the journal resides. The journal_init_inode() call
+is for journals stored in filesystem inodes, or the journal_init_dev()
+call can be use for journal stored on a raw device (in a continuous range
+of blocks). A journal_t is a typedef for a struct pointer, so when
+you are finally finished make sure you call journal_destroy() on it
+to free up any used kernel memory.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Once you have got your journal_t object you need to 'mount' or load the journal
+file, unless of course you haven't initialised it yet - in which case you
+need to call journal_create().
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Most of the time however your journal file will already have been created, but
+before you load it you must call journal_wipe() to empty the journal file.
+Hang on, you say , what if the filesystem wasn't cleanly umount()'d . Well, it is the
+job of the client file system to detect this and skip the call to journal_wipe().
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In either case the next call should be to journal_load() which prepares the
+journal file for use. Note that journal_wipe(..,0) calls journal_skip_recovery()
+for you if it detects any outstanding transactions in the journal and similarly
+journal_load() will call journal_recover() if necessary.
+I would advise reading fs/ext3/super.c for examples on this stage.
+[RGG: Why is the journal_wipe() call necessary - doesn't this needlessly
+complicate the API. Or isn't a good idea for the journal layer to hide
+dirty mounts from the client fs]
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now you can go ahead and start modifying the underlying
+filesystem. Almost.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+You still need to actually journal your filesystem changes, this
+is done by wrapping them into transactions. Additionally you
+also need to wrap the modification of each of the the buffers
+with calls to the journal layer, so it knows what the modifications
+you are actually making are. To do this use journal_start() which
+returns a transaction handle.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+journal_start()
+and its counterpart journal_stop(), which indicates the end of a transaction
+are nestable calls, so you can reenter a transaction if necessary,
+but remember you must call journal_stop() the same number of times as
+journal_start() before the transaction is completed (or more accurately
+leaves the the update phase). Ext3/VFS makes use of this feature to simplify
+quota support.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Inside each transaction you need to wrap the modifications to the
+individual buffers (blocks). Before you start to modify a buffer you
+need to call journal_get_{create,write,undo}_access() as appropriate,
+this allows the journalling layer to copy the unmodified data if it
+needs to. After all the buffer may be part of a previously uncommitted
+transaction.
+At this point you are at last ready to modify a buffer, and once
+you are have done so you need to call journal_dirty_{meta,}data().
+Or if you've asked for access to a buffer you now know is now longer
+required to be pushed back on the device you can call journal_forget()
+in much the same way as you might have used bforget() in the past.
+
+</para>
+
+
+
+<para>
+A journal_flush() may be called at any time to commit and checkpoint
+all your transactions.
+</para>
+<para>
+
+Then at umount time , in your put_super() (2.4) or write_super() (2.5)
+you can then call journal_destroy() to clean up your in-core journal object.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+Unfortunately there a couple of ways the journal layer can cause a deadlock.
+The first thing to note is that each task can only have
+a single outstanding transaction at any one time, remember nothing
+commits until the outermost journal_stop(). This means
+you must complete the transaction at the end of each file/inode/address
+etc. operation you perform, so that the journalling system isn't re-entered
+on another journal. Since transactions can't be nested/batched
+across differing journals, and another filesystem other than
+yours (say ext3) may be modified in a later syscall.
+</para>
+<para>
+
+The second case to bear in mind is that journal_start() can
+block if there isn't enough space in the journal for your transaction
+(based on the passed nblocks param) - when it blocks it merely(!) needs to
+wait for transactions to complete and be committed from other tasks,
+so essentially we are waiting for journal_stop(). So to avoid
+deadlocks you must treat journal_start/stop() as if they
+were semaphores and include them in your semaphore ordering rules to prevent
+deadlocks. Note that journal_extend() has similar blocking behaviour to
+journal_start() so you can deadlock here just as easily as on journal_start().
+</para>
+<para>
+
+Try to reserve the right number of blocks the first time. ;-).
+</para>
+<para>
+Another wriggle to watch out for is your on-disk block allocation strategy.
+why? Because, if you undo a delete, you need to ensure you haven't reused any
+of the freed blocks in a later transaction. One simple way of doing this
+is make sure any blocks you allocate only have checkpointed transactions
+listed against them. Ext3 does this in ext3_test_allocatable().
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Lock is also providing through journal_{un,}lock_updates(),
+ext3 uses this when it wants a window with a clean and stable fs for a moment.
+eg.
+<programlisting>
+
+ journal_lock_updates() //stop new stuff happening..
+ journal_flush() // checkpoint everything.
+ ..do stuff on stable fs
+ journal_unlock_updates() // carry on with filesystem use.
+</programlisting>
+
+The opportunities for abuse and DOS attacks with this should be obvious,
+if you allow unprivileged userspace to trigger codepaths containing these
+calls.
+
+<para>
+</sect1>
+<sect1>
+<title>Summary</title>
+<para>
+Using the journal is a matter of wrapping the different context changes,
+being each mount, each modification (transaction) and each changed buffer
+to tell the journalling layer about them.
+
+Here is a some pseudo code to give you an idea of how it works, as
+an example.
+<programlisting>
+ journal_t* my_jnrl = journal_create();
+ journal_init_{dev,inode}(jnrl,...)
+ if (clean) journal_wipe();
+ journal_load();
+
+ foreach(transaction) { /*transactions must be
+ completed before
+ a syscall returns to
+ userspace*/
+
+ handle_t * xct=journal_start(my_jnrl);
+ foreach(bh) {
+ journal_get_{create,write,undo}_access(xact,bh);
+ if ( myfs_modify(bh) ) { /* returns true
+ if makes changes */
+ journal_dirty_{meta,}data(xact,bh);
+ } else {
+ journal_forget(bh);
+ }
+ }
+ journal_stop(xct);
+ }
+ journal_destroy(my_jrnl);
+</programlisting>
+
+</chapter>
+
+ <chapter id="adt">
+ <title>Data Types</title>
+ <para>
+ The journalling layer uses typedefs to 'hide' the concrete definitions
+ of the structures used. As a client of the JBD layer you can
+ just rely on the using the pointer as a magic cookie of some sort.
+
+ Obviously the hiding is not enforced as this is 'C'.
+ </para>
+ <sect1><title>Structures</title>
+!Iinclude/linux/jbd.h
+ </sect1>
+</chapter>
+
+ <chapter id="calls">
+ <title>Functions</title>
+ <para>
+ The functions here are split into two groups those that
+ affect a journal as a whole, and those which are used to
+ manage transactions
+</para>
+ <sect1><title>Journal Level</title>
+!Efs/jbd/journal.c
+!Efs/jbd/recovery.c
+ </sect1>
+ <sect1><title>Transasction Level</title>
+!Efs/jbd/transaction.c
+ </sect1>
+</chapter>
+<chapter>
+ <title>See also</title>
+ <para>
+ <citation>
+ <ulink url="ftp://ftp.uk.linux.org/pub/linux/sct/fs/jfs/journal-design.ps.gz">
+ Journaling the Linux ext2fs Filesystem,LinuxExpo 98, Stephen Tweedie
+ </ulink>
+ </citation>
+ </para>
+ <para>
+ <citation>
+ <ulink url="http://olstrans.sourceforge.net/release/OLS2000-ext3/OLS2000-ext3.html">
+ Ext3 Journalling FileSystem , OLS 2000, Dr. Stephen Tweedie
+ </ulink>
+ </citation>
+ </para>
+</chapter>
+
+</book>
diff -Nru a/fs/jbd/journal.c b/fs/jbd/journal.c
--- a/fs/jbd/journal.c Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
+++ b/fs/jbd/journal.c Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
@@ -730,14 +730,21 @@
* need to set up all of the mapping information to tell the journaling
* system where the journal blocks are.
*
- * journal_init_dev creates a journal which maps a fixed contiguous
- * range of blocks on an arbitrary block device.
- *
- * journal_init_inode creates a journal which maps an on-disk inode as
- * the journal. The inode must exist already, must support bmap() and
- * must have all data blocks preallocated.
*/

+ /**
+ * journal_t * journal_init_dev() - creates an initialises a journal structure
+ * @kdev: Block device on which to create the journal
+ * @fs_dev: Device which hold journalled filesystem for this journal.
+ * @start: Block nr Start of journal.
+ * @len: Lenght of the journal in blocks.
+ * @blocksize: blocksize of journalling device
+ * @returns: a newly created journal_t *
+ *
+ * journal_init_dev creates a journal which maps a fixed contiguous
+ * range of blocks on an arbitrary block device.
+ *
+ */
journal_t * journal_init_dev(kdev_t dev, kdev_t fs_dev,
int start, int len, int blocksize)
{
@@ -760,7 +767,15 @@

return journal;
}
-
+
+/**
+ * journal_t * journal_init_inode () - creates a journal which maps to a inode.
+ * @inode: An inode to create the journal in
+ *
+ * journal_init_inode creates a journal which maps an on-disk inode as
+ * the journal. The inode must exist already, must support bmap() and
+ * must have all data blocks preallocated.
+ */
journal_t * journal_init_inode (struct inode *inode)
{
struct buffer_head *bh;
@@ -850,12 +865,15 @@
return 0;
}

-/*
+/**
+ * int journal_create() - Initialise the new journal file
+ * @journal: Journal to create. This structure must have been initialised
+ *
* Given a journal_t structure which tells us which disk blocks we can
* use, create a new journal superblock and initialise all of the
- * journal fields from scratch. */
-
-int journal_create (journal_t *journal)
+ * journal fields from scratch.
+ **/
+int journal_create(journal_t *journal)
{
unsigned long blocknr;
struct buffer_head *bh;
@@ -916,11 +934,14 @@
return journal_reset(journal);
}

-/*
+/**
+ * void journal_update_superblock() - Update journal sb on disk.
+ * @journal: The journal to update.
+ * @wait: Set to '0' if you don't want to wait for IO completion.
+ *
* Update a journal's dynamic superblock fields and write it to disk,
* optionally waiting for the IO to complete.
-*/
-
+ */
void journal_update_superblock(journal_t *journal, int wait)
{
journal_superblock_t *sb = journal->j_superblock;
@@ -1036,12 +1057,14 @@
}


-/*
+/**
+ * int journal_load() - Read journal from disk.
+ * @journal: Journal to act on.
+ *
* Given a journal_t structure which tells us which disk blocks contain
* a journal, read the journal from disk to initialise the in-memory
* structures.
*/
-
int journal_load(journal_t *journal)
{
int err;
@@ -1086,11 +1109,13 @@
return -EIO;
}

-/*
+/**
+ * void journal_destroy() - Release a journal_t structure.
+ * @journal: Journal to act on.
+*
* Release a journal_t structure once it is no longer in use by the
* journaled object.
*/
-
void journal_destroy (journal_t *journal)
{
/* Wait for the commit thread to wake up and die. */
@@ -1128,8 +1153,12 @@
}


-/* Published API: Check whether the journal uses all of a given set of
- * features. Return true (non-zero) if it does. */
+/**
+ *int journal_check_used_features () - Check if features specified are used.
+ *
+ * Check whether the journal uses all of a given set of
+ * features. Return true (non-zero) if it does.
+ **/

int journal_check_used_features (journal_t *journal, unsigned long compat,
unsigned long ro, unsigned long incompat)
@@ -1151,7 +1180,10 @@
return 0;
}

-/* Published API: Check whether the journaling code supports the use of
+/**
+ * int journal_check_available_features() - Check feature set in journalling layer
+ *
+ * Check whether the journaling code supports the use of
* all of a given set of features on this journal. Return true
* (non-zero) if it can. */

@@ -1180,8 +1212,13 @@
return 0;
}

-/* Published API: Mark a given journal feature as present on the
- * superblock. Returns true if the requested features could be set. */
+/**
+ * int journal_set_features () - Mark a given journal feature in the superblock
+ *
+ * Mark a given journal feature as present on the
+ * superblock. Returns true if the requested features could be set.
+ *
+ */

int journal_set_features (journal_t *journal, unsigned long compat,
unsigned long ro, unsigned long incompat)
@@ -1207,12 +1244,12 @@
}


-/*
- * Published API:
+/**
+ * int journal_update_format () - Update on-disk journal structure.
+ *
* Given an initialised but unloaded journal struct, poke about in the
* on-disk structure to update it to the most recent supported version.
*/
-
int journal_update_format (journal_t *journal)
{
journal_superblock_t *sb;
@@ -1262,7 +1299,10 @@
}


-/*
+/**
+ * int journal_flush () - Flush journal
+ * @journal: Journal to act on.
+ *
* Flush all data for a given journal to disk and empty the journal.
* Filesystems can use this when remounting readonly to ensure that
* recovery does not need to happen on remount.
@@ -1316,12 +1356,16 @@
return err;
}

-/*
+/**
+ * int journal_wipe() - Wipe journal contents
+ * @journal: Journal to act on.
+ * @write: flag (see below)
+ *
* Wipe out all of the contents of a journal, safely. This will produce
* a warning if the journal contains any valid recovery information.
* Must be called between journal_init_*() and journal_load().
*
- * If (write) is non-zero, then we wipe out the journal on disk; otherwise
+ * If 'write' is non-zero, then we wipe out the journal on disk; otherwise
* we merely suppress recovery.
*/

@@ -1370,43 +1414,11 @@
}

/*
- * journal_abort: perform a complete, immediate shutdown of the ENTIRE
- * journal (not of a single transaction). This operation cannot be
- * undone without closing and reopening the journal.
- *
- * The journal_abort function is intended to support higher level error
- * recovery mechanisms such as the ext2/ext3 remount-readonly error
- * mode.
- *
- * Journal abort has very specific semantics. Any existing dirty,
- * unjournaled buffers in the main filesystem will still be written to
- * disk by bdflush, but the journaling mechanism will be suspended
- * immediately and no further transaction commits will be honoured.
- *
- * Any dirty, journaled buffers will be written back to disk without
- * hitting the journal. Atomicity cannot be guaranteed on an aborted
- * filesystem, but we _do_ attempt to leave as much data as possible
- * behind for fsck to use for cleanup.
- *
- * Any attempt to get a new transaction handle on a journal which is in
- * ABORT state will just result in an -EROFS error return. A
- * journal_stop on an existing handle will return -EIO if we have
- * entered abort state during the update.
- *
- * Recursive transactions are not disturbed by journal abort until the
- * final journal_stop, which will receive the -EIO error.
- *
- * Finally, the journal_abort call allows the caller to supply an errno
- * which will be recored (if possible) in the journal superblock. This
- * allows a client to record failure conditions in the middle of a
- * transaction without having to complete the transaction to record the
- * failure to disk. ext3_error, for example, now uses this
- * functionality.
+ * Journal abort has very specific semantics, which we describe
+ * for journal abort.
*
- * Errors which originate from within the journaling layer will NOT
- * supply an errno; a null errno implies that absolutely no further
- * writes are done to the journal (unless there are any already in
- * progress).
+ * Two internal function, which provide abort to te jbd layer
+ * itself are here.
*/

/* Quick version for internal journal use (doesn't lock the journal).
@@ -1444,7 +1456,52 @@
journal_update_superblock(journal, 1);
}

-/* Full version for external use */
+/**
+ * void journal_abort () - Shutdown the journal immediately.
+ * @journal: the journal to shutdown.
+ * @errno: an error number to record in the journal indicating
+ * the reason for the shutdown.
+ *
+ * Perform a complete, immediate shutdown of the ENTIRE
+ * journal (not of a single transaction). This operation cannot be
+ * undone without closing and reopening the journal.
+ *
+ * The journal_abort function is intended to support higher level error
+ * recovery mechanisms such as the ext2/ext3 remount-readonly error
+ * mode.
+ *
+ * Journal abort has very specific semantics. Any existing dirty,
+ * unjournaled buffers in the main filesystem will still be written to
+ * disk by bdflush, but the journaling mechanism will be suspended
+ * immediately and no further transaction commits will be honoured.
+ *
+ * Any dirty, journaled buffers will be written back to disk without
+ * hitting the journal. Atomicity cannot be guaranteed on an aborted
+ * filesystem, but we _do_ attempt to leave as much data as possible
+ * behind for fsck to use for cleanup.
+ *
+ * Any attempt to get a new transaction handle on a journal which is in
+ * ABORT state will just result in an -EROFS error return. A
+ * journal_stop on an existing handle will return -EIO if we have
+ * entered abort state during the update.
+ *
+ * Recursive transactions are not disturbed by journal abort until the
+ * final journal_stop, which will receive the -EIO error.
+ *
+ * Finally, the journal_abort call allows the caller to supply an errno
+ * which will be recorded (if possible) in the journal superblock. This
+ * allows a client to record failure conditions in the middle of a
+ * transaction without having to complete the transaction to record the
+ * failure to disk. ext3_error, for example, now uses this
+ * functionality.
+ *
+ * Errors which originate from within the journaling layer will NOT
+ * supply an errno; a null errno implies that absolutely no further
+ * writes are done to the journal (unless there are any already in
+ * progress).
+ *
+ */
+
void journal_abort (journal_t *journal, int errno)
{
lock_journal(journal);
@@ -1452,6 +1509,17 @@
unlock_journal(journal);
}

+/**
+ * int journal_errno () - returns the journal's error state.
+ * @journal: journal to examine.
+ *
+ * This is the errno numbet set with journal_abort(), the last
+ * time the journal was mounted - if the journal was stopped
+ * without calling abort this will be 0.
+ *
+ * If the journal has been aborted on this mount time -EROFS will
+ * be returned.
+ */
int journal_errno (journal_t *journal)
{
int err;
@@ -1465,6 +1533,14 @@
return err;
}

+
+
+/**
+ * int journal_clear_err () - clears the journal's error state
+ *
+ * An error must be cleared or Acked to take a FS out of readonly
+ * mode.
+ */
int journal_clear_err (journal_t *journal)
{
int err = 0;
@@ -1478,6 +1554,13 @@
return err;
}

+
+/**
+ * void journal_ack_err() - Ack journal err.
+ *
+ * An error must be cleared or Acked to take a FS out of readonly
+ * mode.
+ */
void journal_ack_err (journal_t *journal)
{
lock_journal(journal);
diff -Nru a/fs/jbd/recovery.c b/fs/jbd/recovery.c
--- a/fs/jbd/recovery.c Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
+++ b/fs/jbd/recovery.c Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
@@ -207,20 +207,22 @@
var -= ((journal)->j_last - (journal)->j_first); \
} while (0)

-/*
- * journal_recover
- *
+/**
+ * int journal_recover(journal_t *journal) - recovers a on-disk journal
+ * @journal: the journal to recover
+ *
* The primary function for recovering the log contents when mounting a
* journaled device.
- *
+ */
+int journal_recover(journal_t *journal)
+{
+/*
* Recovery is done in three passes. In the first pass, we look for the
* end of the log. In the second, we assemble the list of revoke
* blocks. In the third and final pass, we replay any un-revoked blocks
* in the log.
*/

-int journal_recover(journal_t *journal)
-{
int err;
journal_superblock_t * sb;

@@ -264,20 +266,23 @@
return err;
}

-/*
- * journal_skip_recovery
- *
+/**
+ * int journal_skip_recovery() - Start journal and wipe exiting records
+ * @journal: journal to startup
+ *
* Locate any valid recovery information from the journal and set up the
* journal structures in memory to ignore it (presumably because the
* caller has evidence that it is out of date).
- *
+ * This function does'nt appear to be exorted..
+ */
+int journal_skip_recovery(journal_t *journal)
+{
+/*
* We perform one pass over the journal to allow us to tell the user how
* much recovery information is being erased, and to let us initialise
* the journal transaction sequence numbers to the next unused ID.
*/

-int journal_skip_recovery(journal_t *journal)
-{
int err;
journal_superblock_t * sb;

diff -Nru a/fs/jbd/transaction.c b/fs/jbd/transaction.c
--- a/fs/jbd/transaction.c Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
+++ b/fs/jbd/transaction.c Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
@@ -201,19 +201,20 @@
return 0;
}

-/*
- * Obtain a new handle.
+/**
+ * handle_t *journal_start() - Obtain a new handle.
+ * @journal: Journal to start transaction on.
+ * @nblocks: number of block buffer we might modify
*
* We make sure that the transaction can guarantee at least nblocks of
* modified buffers in the log. We block until the log can guarantee
* that much space.
*
- * This function is visible to journal users (like ext2fs), so is not
+ * This function is visible to journal users (like ext3fs), so is not
* called with the journal already locked.
*
* Return a pointer to a newly allocated handle, or NULL on failure
*/
-
handle_t *journal_start(journal_t *journal, int nblocks)
{
handle_t *handle = journal_current_handle();
@@ -306,7 +307,11 @@
return ret;
}

-/*
+/**
+ * handle_t *journal_try_start() - Don't block, but try and get a handle
+ * @journal: Journal to start transaction on.
+ * @nblocks: number of block buffer we might modify
+ *
* Try to start a handle, but non-blockingly. If we weren't able
* to, return an ERR_PTR value.
*/
@@ -353,16 +358,18 @@
return handle;
}

-/*
- * journal_extend: extend buffer credits.
- *
+/**
+ * int journal_extend() - extend buffer credits.
+ * @handle: handle to 'extend'
+ * @nblocks: nr blocks to try to extend by.
+ *
* Some transactions, such as large extends and truncates, can be done
* atomically all at once or in several stages. The operation requests
* a credit for a number of buffer modications in advance, but can
* extend its credit if it needs more.
*
* journal_extend tries to give the running handle more buffer credits.
- * It does not guarantee that allocation: this is a best-effort only.
+ * It does not guarantee that allocation - this is a best-effort only.
* The calling process MUST be able to deal cleanly with a failure to
* extend here.
*
@@ -371,7 +378,6 @@
* return code < 0 implies an error
* return code > 0 implies normal transaction-full status.
*/
-
int journal_extend (handle_t *handle, int nblocks)
{
transaction_t *transaction = handle->h_transaction;
@@ -420,8 +426,12 @@
}


-/*
- * journal_restart: restart a handle for a multi-transaction filesystem
+/**
+ * int journal_restart() - restart a handle .
+ * @handle: handle to restart
+ * @nblocks: nr credits requested
+ *
+ * Restart a handle for a multi-transaction filesystem
* operation.
*
* If the journal_extend() call above fails to grant new buffer credits
@@ -463,8 +473,9 @@
}


-/*
- * Barrier operation: establish a transaction barrier.
+/**
+ * void journal_lock_updates () - establish a transaction barrier.
+ * @journal: Journal to establish a barrier on.
*
* This locks out any further updates from being started, and blocks
* until all existing updates have completed, returning only once the
@@ -472,7 +483,6 @@
*
* The journal lock should not be held on entry.
*/
-
void journal_lock_updates (journal_t *journal)
{
lock_journal(journal);
@@ -500,12 +510,14 @@
down(&journal->j_barrier);
}

-/*
+/**
+ * void journal_unlock_updates (journal_t* journal) - release barrier
+ * @journal: Journal to release the barrier on.
+ *
* Release a transaction barrier obtained with journal_lock_updates().
*
* Should be called without the journal lock held.
*/
-
void journal_unlock_updates (journal_t *journal)
{
lock_journal(journal);
@@ -519,23 +531,14 @@
}

/*
- * journal_get_write_access: notify intent to modify a buffer for metadata
- * (not data) update.
- *
- * If the buffer is already part of the current transaction, then there
- * is nothing we need to do. If it is already part of a prior
+ * if the buffer is already part of the current transaction, then there
+ * is nothing we need to do. if it is already part of a prior
* transaction which we are still committing to disk, then we need to
* make sure that we do not overwrite the old copy: we do copy-out to
- * preserve the copy going to disk. We also account the buffer against
+ * preserve the copy going to disk. we also account the buffer against
* the handle's metadata buffer credits (unless the buffer is already
* part of the transaction, that is).
- *
- * Returns an error code or 0 on success.
- *
- * In full data journalling mode the buffer may be of type BJ_AsyncData,
- * because we're write()ing a buffer which is also part of a shared mapping.
*/
-
static int
do_get_write_access(handle_t *handle, struct journal_head *jh, int force_copy)
{
@@ -749,6 +752,17 @@
return error;
}

+/**
+ * int journal_get_write_access() - notify intent to modify a buffer for metadata (not data) update.
+ * @handle: transaction to add buffer modifications to
+ * @bh: bh to be used for metadata writes
+ *
+ * Returns an error code or 0 on success.
+ *
+ * In full data journalling mode the buffer may be of type BJ_AsyncData,
+ * because we're write()ing a buffer which is also part of a shared mapping.
+ */
+
int journal_get_write_access (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh)
{
transaction_t *transaction = handle->h_transaction;
@@ -779,6 +793,13 @@
* There is no lock ranking violation: it was a newly created,
* unlocked buffer beforehand. */

+/**
+ * int journal_get_create_access () - notify intent to use newly created bh
+ * @handle: ransaction to new buffer to
+ * @bh: new buffer.
+ *
+ * Call this if you create a new bh.
+ */
int journal_get_create_access (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh)
{
transaction_t *transaction = handle->h_transaction;
@@ -840,13 +861,14 @@



-/*
- * journal_get_undo_access: Notify intent to modify metadata with non-
- * rewindable consequences
- *
+/**
+ * int journal_get_undo_access() - Notify intent to modify metadata with non-rewindable consequences
+ * @handle: transaction
+ * @bh: buffer to undo
+ *
* Sometimes there is a need to distinguish between metadata which has
* been committed to disk and that which has not. The ext3fs code uses
- * this for freeing and allocating space: we have to make sure that we
+ * this for freeing and allocating space, we have to make sure that we
* do not reuse freed space until the deallocation has been committed,
* since if we overwrote that space we would make the delete
* un-rewindable in case of a crash.
@@ -858,13 +880,12 @@
* as we know that the buffer has definitely been committed to disk.
*
* We never need to know which transaction the committed data is part
- * of: buffers touched here are guaranteed to be dirtied later and so
+ * of, buffers touched here are guaranteed to be dirtied later and so
* will be committed to a new transaction in due course, at which point
* we can discard the old committed data pointer.
*
* Returns error number or 0 on success.
*/
-
int journal_get_undo_access (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh)
{
journal_t *journal = handle->h_transaction->t_journal;
@@ -906,10 +927,12 @@
return err;
}

-/*
- * journal_dirty_data: mark a buffer as containing dirty data which
- * needs to be flushed before we can commit the current transaction.
- *
+/**
+ * int journal_dirty_data() - mark a buffer as containing dirty data which needs to be flushed before we can commit the current transaction.
+ * @handle: transaction
+ * @bh: bufferhead to mark
+ * @async: flag
+ *
* The buffer is placed on the transaction's data list and is marked as
* belonging to the transaction.
*
@@ -918,7 +941,10 @@
* t_async_datalist.
*
* Returns error number or 0 on success.
- *
+ */
+int journal_dirty_data (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh, int async)
+{
+/*
* journal_dirty_data() can be called via page_launder->ext3_writepage
* by kswapd. So it cannot block. Happily, there's nothing here
* which needs lock_journal if `async' is set.
@@ -927,9 +953,6 @@
* between BJ_AsyncData and BJ_SyncData according to who tried to
* change its state last.
*/
-
-int journal_dirty_data (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh, int async)
-{
journal_t *journal = handle->h_transaction->t_journal;
int need_brelse = 0;
int wanted_jlist = async ? BJ_AsyncData : BJ_SyncData;
@@ -1072,24 +1095,28 @@
return 0;
}

-/*
- * journal_dirty_metadata: mark a buffer as containing dirty metadata
- * which needs to be journaled as part of the current transaction.
+/**
+ * int journal_dirty_metadata() - mark a buffer as containing dirty metadata
+ * @handle: transaction to add buffer to.
+ * @bh: buffer to mark
+ *
+ * mark dirty metadata which needs to be journaled as part of the current transaction.
*
* The buffer is placed on the transaction's metadata list and is marked
* as belonging to the transaction.
*
+ * Returns error number or 0 on success.
+ */
+int journal_dirty_metadata (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh)
+{
+/*
* Special care needs to be taken if the buffer already belongs to the
* current committing transaction (in which case we should have frozen
* data present for that commit). In that case, we don't relink the
* buffer: that only gets done when the old transaction finally
* completes its commit.
*
- * Returns error number or 0 on success.
*/
-
-int journal_dirty_metadata (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh)
-{
transaction_t *transaction = handle->h_transaction;
journal_t *journal = transaction->t_journal;
struct journal_head *jh = bh2jh(bh);
@@ -1175,9 +1202,12 @@
}
#endif

-/*
- * journal_forget: bforget() for potentially-journaled buffers. We can
- * only do the bforget if there are no commits pending against the
+/**
+ * void journal_forget() - bforget() for potentially-journaled buffers.
+ * @handle: transaction handle
+ * @bh: bh to 'forget'
+ *
+ * We can only do the bforget if there are no commits pending against the
* buffer. If the buffer is dirty in the current running transaction we
* can safely unlink it.
*
@@ -1189,7 +1219,6 @@
* Allow this call even if the handle has aborted --- it may be part of
* the caller's cleanup after an abort.
*/
-
void journal_forget (handle_t *handle, struct buffer_head *bh)
{
transaction_t *transaction = handle->h_transaction;
@@ -1328,7 +1357,10 @@
}
#endif

-/*
+/**
+ * int journal_stop() - complete a transaction
+ * @handle: tranaction to complete.
+ *
* All done for a particular handle.
*
* There is not much action needed here. We just return any remaining
@@ -1341,7 +1373,6 @@
* return -EIO if a journal_abort has been executed since the
* transaction began.
*/
-
int journal_stop(handle_t *handle)
{
transaction_t *transaction = handle->h_transaction;
@@ -1425,8 +1456,10 @@
return err;
}

-/*
- * For synchronous operations: force any uncommitted trasnactions
+/**int journal_force_commit() - force any uncommitted transactions
+ * @journal: journal to force
+ *
+ * For synchronous operations: force any uncommitted transactions
* to disk. May seem kludgy, but it reuses all the handle batching
* code in a very simple manner.
*/
@@ -1630,6 +1663,26 @@
return 0;
}

+
+/**
+ * int journal_try_to_free_buffers() - try to free page buffers.
+ * @journal: journal for operation
+ * @page: to try and free
+ * @gfp_mask: 'IO' mode for try_to_free_buffers()
+ *
+ *
+ * For all the buffers on this page,
+ * if they are fully written out ordered data, move them onto BUF_CLEAN
+ * so try_to_free_buffers() can reap them.
+ *
+ * This function returns non-zero if we wish try_to_free_buffers()
+ * to be called. We do this if the page is releasable by try_to_free_buffers().
+ * We also do it if the page has locked or dirty buffers and the caller wants
+ * us to perform sync or async writeout.
+ */
+int journal_try_to_free_buffers(journal_t *journal,
+ struct page *page, int gfp_mask)
+{
/*
* journal_try_to_free_buffers(). For all the buffers on this page,
* if they are fully written out ordered data, move them onto BUF_CLEAN
@@ -1654,14 +1707,7 @@
* cannot happen because we never reallocate freed data as metadata
* while the data is part of a transaction. Yes?
*
- * This function returns non-zero if we wish try_to_free_buffers()
- * to be called. We do this is the page is releasable by try_to_free_buffers().
- * We also do it if the page has locked or dirty buffers and the caller wants
- * us to perform sync or async writeout.
*/
-int journal_try_to_free_buffers(journal_t *journal,
- struct page *page, int gfp_mask)
-{
struct buffer_head *bh;
struct buffer_head *tmp;
int locked_or_dirty = 0;
@@ -1872,8 +1918,15 @@
return may_free;
}

-/*
- * Return non-zero if the page's buffers were successfully reaped
+/**
+ * int journal_flushpage()
+ * @journal: journal to use for flush...
+ * @page: page to flush
+ * @offset: length of page to flush.
+ *
+ * Reap page buffers containing data after offset in page.
+ *
+ * Return non-zero if the page's buffers were successfully reaped.
*/
int journal_flushpage(journal_t *journal,
struct page *page,
diff -Nru a/include/linux/jbd.h b/include/linux/jbd.h
--- a/include/linux/jbd.h Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
+++ b/include/linux/jbd.h Wed Aug 14 22:13:58 2002
@@ -62,7 +62,38 @@
#define JFS_MIN_JOURNAL_BLOCKS 1024

#ifdef __KERNEL__
+
+/**
+ * typedef handle_t - The handle_t type represents a single atomic update being performed by some process.
+ *
+ * All filesystem modifications made by the process go
+ * through this handle. Recursive operations (such as quota operations)
+ * are gathered into a single update.
+ *
+ * The buffer credits field is used to account for journaled buffers
+ * being modified by the running process. To ensure that there is
+ * enough log space for all outstanding operations, we need to limit the
+ * number of outstanding buffers possible at any time. When the
+ * operation completes, any buffer credits not used are credited back to
+ * the transaction, so that at all times we know how many buffers the
+ * outstanding updates on a transaction might possibly touch.
+ *
+ * This is an opaque datatype.
+ **/
typedef struct handle_s handle_t; /* Atomic operation type */
+
+
+/**
+ * typedef journal_t - The journal_t maintains all of the journaling state information for a single filesystem.
+ *
+ * journal_t is linked to from the fs superblock structure.
+ *
+ * We use the journal_t to keep track of all outstanding transaction
+ * activity on the filesystem, and to manage the state of the log
+ * writing process.
+ *
+ * This is an opaque datatype.
+ **/
typedef struct journal_s journal_t; /* Journal control structure */
#endif

@@ -251,18 +282,20 @@

struct jbd_revoke_table_s;

-/* The handle_t type represents a single atomic update being performed
- * by some process. All filesystem modifications made by the process go
- * through this handle. Recursive operations (such as quota operations)
- * are gathered into a single update.
- *
- * The buffer credits field is used to account for journaled buffers
- * being modified by the running process. To ensure that there is
- * enough log space for all outstanding operations, we need to limit the
- * number of outstanding buffers possible at any time. When the
- * operation completes, any buffer credits not used are credited back to
- * the transaction, so that at all times we know how many buffers the
- * outstanding updates on a transaction might possibly touch. */
+/**
+ * struct handle_s - The handle_s type is the concrete type associated with handle_t.
+ * @h_transaction: Which compound transaction is this update a part of?
+ * @h_buffer_credits: Number of remaining buffers we are allowed to dirty.
+ * @h_ref: Reference count on this handle
+ * @h_err: Field for caller's use to track errors through large fs operations
+ * @h_sync: flag for sync-on-close
+ * @h_jdata: flag to force data journaling
+ * @h_aborted: flag indicating fatal error on handle
+ **/
+
+/* Docbook can't yet cope with the bit fields, but will leave the documentation
+ * in so it can be fixed later.
+ */

struct handle_s
{
@@ -275,8 +308,8 @@
/* Reference count on this handle */
int h_ref;

- /* Field for caller's use to track errors through large fs
- operations */
+ /* Field for caller's use to track errors through large fs */
+ /* operations */
int h_err;

/* Flags */
@@ -400,21 +433,58 @@
int t_handle_count;
};

-
-/* The journal_t maintains all of the journaling state information for a
- * single filesystem. It is linked to from the fs superblock structure.
- *
- * We use the journal_t to keep track of all outstanding transaction
- * activity on the filesystem, and to manage the state of the log
- * writing process. */
+/**
+ * struct journal_s - The journal_s type is the concrete type associated with journal_t.
+ * @j_flags: General journaling state flags
+ * @j_errno: Is there an outstanding uncleared error on the journal (from a prior abort)?
+ * @j_sb_buffer: First part of superblock buffer
+ * @j_superblock: Second part of superblock buffer
+ * @j_format_version: Version of the superblock format
+ * @j_barrier_count: Number of processes waiting to create a barrier lock
+ * @j_barrier: The barrier lock itself
+ * @j_running_transaction: The current running transaction..
+ * @j_committing_transaction: the transaction we are pushing to disk
+ * @j_checkpoint_transactions: a linked circular list of all transactions waiting for checkpointing
+ * @j_wait_transaction_locked: Wait queue for waiting for a locked transaction to start committing, or for a barrier lock to be released
+ * @j_wait_logspace: Wait queue for waiting for checkpointing to complete
+ * @j_wait_done_commit: Wait queue for waiting for commit to complete
+ * @j_wait_checkpoint: Wait queue to trigger checkpointing
+ * @j_wait_commit: Wait queue to trigger commit
+ * @j_wait_updates: Wait queue to wait for updates to complete
+ * @j_checkpoint_sem: Semaphore for locking against concurrent checkpoints
+ * @j_sem: The main journal lock, used by lock_journal()
+ * @j_head: Journal head - identifies the first unused block in the journal
+ * @j_tail: Journal tail - identifies the oldest still-used block in the journal.
+ * @j_free: Journal free - how many free blocks are there in the journal?
+ * @j_first: The block number of the first usable block
+ * @j_last: The block number one beyond the last usable block
+ * @j_dev: Device where we store the journal
+ * @j_blocksize: blocksize for the location where we store the journal.
+ * @j_blk_offset: starting block offset for into the device where we store the journal
+ * @j_fs_dev: Device which holds the client fs. For internal journal this will be equal to j_dev
+ * @j_maxlen: Total maximum capacity of the journal region on disk.
+ * @j_inode: Optional inode where we store the journal. If present, all journal block numbers are mapped into this inode via bmap().
+ * @j_tail_sequence: Sequence number of the oldest transaction in the log
+ * @j_transaction_sequence: Sequence number of the next transaction to grant
+ * @j_commit_sequence: Sequence number of the most recently committed transaction
+ * @j_commit_request: Sequence number of the most recent transaction wanting commit
+ * @j_uuid: Uuid of client object.
+ * @j_task: Pointer to the current commit thread for this journal
+ * @j_max_transaction_buffers: Maximum number of metadata buffers to allow in a single compound commit transaction
+ * @j_commit_interval: What is the maximum transaction lifetime before we begin a commit?
+ * @j_commit_timer: The timer used to wakeup the commit thread
+ * @j_commit_timer_active: Timer flag
+ * @j_all_journals: Link all journals together - system-wide
+ * @j_revoke: The revoke table - maintains the list of revoked blocks in the current transaction.
+ **/

struct journal_s
{
/* General journaling state flags */
unsigned long j_flags;

- /* Is there an outstanding uncleared error on the journal (from
- * a prior abort)? */
+ /* Is there an outstanding uncleared error on the journal (from */
+ /* a prior abort)? */
int j_errno;

/* The superblock buffer */
@@ -436,13 +506,13 @@
/* ... the transaction we are pushing to disk ... */
transaction_t * j_committing_transaction;

- /* ... and a linked circular list of all transactions waiting
- * for checkpointing. */
+ /* ... and a linked circular list of all transactions waiting */
+ /* for checkpointing. */
/* Protected by journal_datalist_lock */
transaction_t * j_checkpoint_transactions;

- /* Wait queue for waiting for a locked transaction to start
- committing, or for a barrier lock to be released */
+ /* Wait queue for waiting for a locked transaction to start */
+ /* committing, or for a barrier lock to be released */
wait_queue_head_t j_wait_transaction_locked;

/* Wait queue for waiting for checkpointing to complete */
@@ -469,33 +539,33 @@
/* Journal head: identifies the first unused block in the journal. */
unsigned long j_head;

- /* Journal tail: identifies the oldest still-used block in the
- * journal. */
+ /* Journal tail: identifies the oldest still-used block in the */
+ /* journal. */
unsigned long j_tail;

/* Journal free: how many free blocks are there in the journal? */
unsigned long j_free;

- /* Journal start and end: the block numbers of the first usable
- * block and one beyond the last usable block in the journal. */
+ /* Journal start and end: the block numbers of the first usable */
+ /* block and one beyond the last usable block in the journal. */
unsigned long j_first, j_last;

- /* Device, blocksize and starting block offset for the location
- * where we store the journal. */
+ /* Device, blocksize and starting block offset for the location */
+ /* where we store the journal. */
kdev_t j_dev;
int j_blocksize;
unsigned int j_blk_offset;

- /* Device which holds the client fs. For internal journal this
- * will be equal to j_dev. */
+ /* Device which holds the client fs. For internal journal this */
+ /* will be equal to j_dev. */
kdev_t j_fs_dev;

/* Total maximum capacity of the journal region on disk. */
unsigned int j_maxlen;

- /* Optional inode where we store the journal. If present, all
- * journal block numbers are mapped into this inode via
- * bmap(). */
+ /* Optional inode where we store the journal. If present, all */
+ /* journal block numbers are mapped into this inode via */
+ /* bmap(). */
struct inode * j_inode;

/* Sequence number of the oldest transaction in the log */
@@ -507,23 +577,23 @@
/* Sequence number of the most recent transaction wanting commit */
tid_t j_commit_request;

- /* Journal uuid: identifies the object (filesystem, LVM volume
- * etc) backed by this journal. This will eventually be
- * replaced by an array of uuids, allowing us to index multiple
- * devices within a single journal and to perform atomic updates
- * across them. */
+ /* Journal uuid: identifies the object (filesystem, LVM volume */
+ /* etc) backed by this journal. This will eventually be */
+ /* replaced by an array of uuids, allowing us to index multiple */
+ /* devices within a single journal and to perform atomic updates */
+ /* across them. */

__u8 j_uuid[16];

/* Pointer to the current commit thread for this journal */
struct task_struct * j_task;

- /* Maximum number of metadata buffers to allow in a single
- * compound commit transaction */
+ /* Maximum number of metadata buffers to allow in a single */
+ /* compound commit transaction */
int j_max_transaction_buffers;

- /* What is the maximum transaction lifetime before we begin a
- * commit? */
+ /* What is the maximum transaction lifetime before we begin a */
+ /* commit? */
unsigned long j_commit_interval;

/* The timer used to wakeup the commit thread: */
@@ -533,8 +603,8 @@
/* Link all journals together - system-wide */
struct list_head j_all_journals;

- /* The revoke table: maintains the list of revoked blocks in the
- current transaction. */
+ /* The revoke table: maintains the list of revoked blocks in the */
+ /* current transaction. */
struct jbd_revoke_table_s *j_revoke;
};
[unhandled content-type:application/pgp-signature]
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:28    [W:0.090 / U:0.348 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site