lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2002]   [Jun]   [12]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] 2.5.21 - list.h cleanup

On Tue, 11 Jun 2002, Rusty Russell wrote:

> The number of structures and functions which need only "struct xxx *"
> is very high: removing typedefs is something about with ~zero pain
> (unlike dropping the sometimes-dubious loveaffair with inlines).
>
> Rusty.
> PS. I blame Ingo: list_t indeed!

the reason why i added list_t to the scheduler code was mainly for
aesthetic reasons. I'm still using 80x25 text consoles mainly, which are
more sensitive to code length. Also, 'struct list_head' did not reflect
the kind of lightweight list type we have, 'list_t' does that better. Eg.:

unsigned int void some_function(list_t *head, list_t *next, list_t *prev)
{
}

instead of:

unsigned int some_function(struct list_head *head, struct list_head *next,
struct list_head *prev)
{
}

but if typedefs create other problems then these arguments are secondary i
guess. I'm completely against redefining base types for no particular
reason, like counter_t.

But i think it would be useful to introduce some sort of '_t convention',
where _t always means a complex (or potentially complex - opaque) type. It
makes code so much more compact and readable, and it does not hide
anything - _t *always* means a complex type in the way i use it.

To see this in action check out 2.5's drivers/md/raid5.c for example,
replace all the _t types with their full-blown struct equivalents and
compare code readability. And this is not broken code in any way, it's
just code that uses lots of complex types.

Ingo

-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:26    [W:0.079 / U:13.932 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site