lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Sep]   [20]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] Preemption Latency Measurement Tool
Andrea Arcangeli wrote:
>
> On Thu, Sep 20, 2001 at 09:57:50AM +0200, Dieter Nützel wrote:
> > Am Donnerstag, 20. September 2001 08:41 schrieb Andrea Arcangeli:
> > > Those inodes lines reminded me one thing, you may want to give it a try:
> > >
> > > --- 2.4.10pre12aa1/fs/inode.c.~1~ Thu Sep 20 01:44:07 2001
> > > +++ 2.4.10pre12aa1/fs/inode.c Thu Sep 20 08:37:33 2001
> > > @@ -295,6 +295,12 @@
> > > * so we have to start looking from the list head.
> > > */
> > > tmp = head;
> > > +
> > > + if (unlikely(current->need_resched)) {
> > > + spin_unlock(&inode_lock);
> > > + schedule();
> > > + spin_lock(&inode_lock);
> > > + }
> > > }
> > > }
> > >
Be warned, while the above will improve latency, it will not improve the
numbers reported by the tool. The reason is that the tool looks at
actual preemption disable times, so it does not care if "need_resched"
is set or not. This means that, in the case where need_resched is not
set, the tool would report a long latency as if the conditional lock
break code was not present. To get the above code into the tools
purview, you could either code it without the conditional or, better,
put the whole thing into a macro ( I think Ingo called it
"conditional_schedule()") and put the instrumentation stuff in the
macro. Also, in the case of a system with the preemption patch, the
schedule is not needed unless the BKL is also held.

> >
> > You've forgotten a one liner.
> >
> > #include <linux/locks.h>
> > +#include <linux/compiler.h>
>
> woops, didn't trapped it because of gcc 3.0.2. thanks.
>
> > But this is not enough. Even with reniced artsd (-20).
> > Some shorter hiccups (0.5~1 sec).
>
> I'm not familiar with the output of the latency bench, but I actually
> read "4617" usec as the worst latency, that means 4msec, not 500/1000
> msec.
>
> > Worst 20 latency times of 4261 measured in this period.
> > usec cause mask start line/file address end line/file
> ^^^^
> > 4617 reacqBKL 0 1375/sched.c c0114d94 1381/sched.c
> ^^^^
~snip
>
> those are kernel addresses, can you resolve them via System.map rather
> than trying to find their start/end line number?

Uh, trying to find??? These are the names and line numbers provided by
the PPC macros. The only time the address is helpful is when the bad
guy is hiding in an "inline" in a header file. Still, is there a simple
script to get the function/offset from the System.map? We could then
post process with a simple bash/sed script.

>
> > Worst 20 latency times of 8033 measured in this period.
> > usec cause mask start line/file address end line/file
> > 10856 spin_lock 1 1376/sched.c c0114db3 697/sched.c
>
> with dbench 48 we gone to 10msec latency as far I can see (still far
> from 0.5~1 sec). dbench 48 is longer so more probability to get the
> higher latency, and it does more I/O, probably also seeks more, so thre
> are many variables (slower insection in I/O queues first of all, etcll).
> However 10msec isn't that bad, it means 100hz, something that the human
> eye cannot see. 0.5~1 sec would been horribly bad latency instead.. :)

Ah, but we would REALLY like to see it below 1msec.
~snip

George
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:03    [W:0.246 / U:8.680 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site