lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Jul]   [13]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] More pedantry.
Hi!

Thanks for a good exhausting explanation.

Vojtech

On Thu, Jul 12, 2001 at 05:26:57PM -0400, Mike Harrold wrote:
> >
> > On Thu, Jul 12, 2001 at 04:58:45PM -0400, Mike Harrold wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > - * None of the E1AP-E3AP erratas are visible to the user.
> > > > > + * None of the E1AP-E3AP errata are visible to the user.
> > > >
> > > > If you want real pedantry, I think you mean:
> > > >
> > > > > + * None of the E1AP-E3AP errata is visible to the user.
> > > >
> > > > ('none' is singular - read 'not one')
> > > >
> > > > ... several times within this patch.
> > >
> > > No, he was right the first time. Errata is plural. Erratum is the
> > > singular.
> >
> > Yes, but the subject of the sentence is 'none'. Thus the verb should be
> > in singular: None of them *is* visible.
> >
> > But perhaps my version of english is different from yours. I learned
> > mine from textbooks.
>
> I'll partly retract, but the original poster was still correct (see the
> Usage note). The note only handles persons, not items however. The same
> rules should apply though.
>
> /Mike
>
> (nn)
> pron.
>
> 1.No one; not one; nobody: None dared to do it.
> 2.Not any: None of my classmates survived the war.
> 3.No part; not any: none of your business.
>
>
> adv.
>
> 1.Not at all: He is none too ill.
> 2.In no way: The jeans looked none the better for having been washed.
>
>
>
> [Middle English, from Old English nn : ne, no, not; see ne in Indo-European Roots + n, one; see oi-no- in
> Indo-European Roots.]
>
> Usage Note: It is widely asserted that none is equivalent to no one, and hence requires a
> singular verb and singular pronoun: None of the prisoners was given his soup. It is true that
> none is etymologically derived from the Old English word n, "one," but the word has been
> used as both a singular and a plural noun from Old English onward. The plural usage appears
> in the King James Bible as well as the works of John Dryden and Edmund Burke and is
> widespread in the works of respectable writers today. Of course, the singular usage is
> perfectly acceptable. The choice between a singular or plural verb depends on the desired
> effect. Both options are acceptable in this sentence: None of the conspirators has (or have)
> been brought to trial. When none is modified by almost, however, it is difficult to avoid
> treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were (not was) interviewed by the
> committee. None can only be plural in its use in sentences such as None but his most loyal
> supporters believe (not believes) his story. See Usage Note at every. See Usage Note at
> neither. See Usage Note at nothing.

--
Vojtech Pavlik
SuSE Labs
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 12:57    [W:0.079 / U:0.260 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site