lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Mar]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
Date
From
SubjectSubtle NFS/VFS/GLIBC interaction bug

Summary:
Sometimes files are missing when listing a directory.


The following runs on linux-2.4.2 on with glibc-2.2.2 (x86)
The relevant directory is NFS mounted (nfsvers=2)

----------------------- junk.c
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <errno.h>

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
struct DIRENT *ent = 0;
DIR *dir = opendir(argv[1]);
while ((ent = READDIR(dir)))
puts(ent->d_name);
closedir(dir);
}
--------------------------

Let's compare the 32 and 64 bit versions:

% gcc -D_GNU_SOURCE -DDIRENT=dirent -DREADDIR=readdir -o junk32 junk.c
% junk32 .kde/share/mimelnk/
.
..
audio
video
application

% gcc -D_GNU_SOURCE -DDIRENT=dirent64 -DREADDIR=readdir64 -o junk64
junk.c
% junk64 .kde/share/mimelnk/
.
..
audio
video
application
image <--------- This file was missing!

----------------------------

In glibc-2.2.2, both readdir and readdir64 use
syscall __NR_getdents64. Here is a capture of what
__NR_getdents64 returns:

0x62, 0xce, 0xbe, 0x02, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, // d_ino
0x2e, 0x17, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, // d_off
0x18, 0x00, 0x00, /* . */ // d_reclen d_type
0x2e, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, // d_name

0xe0, 0x05, 0xce, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0xe9, 0x34, 0xb9, 0x1e, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x18, 0x00, 0x00, /* .. */
0x2e, 0x2e, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,

0x1d, 0xd0, 0x69, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0xe8, 0x32, 0x39, 0x6d, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x20, 0x00, 0x00, /* audio */
0x61, 0x75, 0x64, 0x69, 0x6f,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,

0xfe, 0xcf, 0x69, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x88, 0xc8, 0x43, 0x6e, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x20, 0x00, 0x00, /* video */
0x76, 0x69, 0x64, 0x65, 0x6f,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,

0xc5, 0x62, 0xe5, 0x02, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0xe3, 0x73, 0xb8, 0x9d, 0xff, 0xff, 0xff, 0xff,
0x20, 0x00, 0x00, /* application */
0x61, 0x70, 0x70, 0x6c, 0x69,
0x63, 0x61, 0x74, 0x69, 0x6f, 0x6e, 0x00, 0x00,

0xa8, 0xa1, 0x87, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0xff, 0xff, 0xff, 0xff, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, // last d_ino
0x20, 0x00, 0x00, /* image */
0x69, 0x6d, 0x61, 0x67, 0x65,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00


Note the strange numbers in the d_off fields.
These are in fact cookies used internally by nfs.
Under nfs2, these are 32 bit unsigned number,
sign extended to 64 bits.

The last cookie has not been properly sign extended.
The glibc-2.2.2 source code for readdir uses __NR_getdents64
and converts the result into 32 bit dirents.
But it sees that the last d_ino cannot fit in an off_t
and it simply bails out.

There is already a problem in the making since
nfs3 cookies are 64 bits long. But things should
work with nfs2.

Everything happens in fact in linux/fs/readdir.c.
The dirent64 buffers are build using a function
of type filldir_t. This functions takes
an off_t offset and writes it into the d_ino.
To be 64 bit clean, this function should
take a loff_t.

Nevertheless, it happens that the last offset is
directly filled by function sys_getdents64 using
file->f_pos which is a signed loff_t.
It is set somewhere in linux/fs/nfs/dir.c from an
unsigned 64 bit cookie variable containing 0xffffffff,
that is to say the unsigned 32 bit cookie used to
indicate the end of the directory.
That explains the value of the last d_off field.


I can fix the problem using the following hack:

--- readdir.c.orig Thu Mar 8 15:21:09 2001
+++ readdir.c Thu Mar 8 15:21:39 2001
@@ -315,7 +315,7 @@
lastdirent = buf.previous;
if (lastdirent) {
struct linux_dirent64 d;
- d.d_off = file->f_pos;
+ d.d_off = (off_t)file->f_pos;
copy_to_user(&lastdirent->d_off, &d.d_off,
sizeof(d.d_off));
error = count - buf.count;
}
That is acceptable as long as filldir_t
does not handle 64bits offsets anyway.

But it won't last.



Hope this helps.

- Leon Bottou
<leonb@research.att.com>
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:29    [W:0.030 / U:7.464 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site