lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Mar]   [30]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectStrange lines in dmesg
Date
Hello,

I got the following lines in dmesg:

free sibling
task PC stack pid father child younger older
init S C144DF28 4912 1 0 840 (NOTLB)
Call Trace: [<c01111ab>] [<c01110f0>] [<c01398e5>] [<c0139c8e>] [<c01330c4>]
[<c0106dd7>]
keventd S FFFFFFFF 6020 2 1 (L-TLB) 3
Call Trace: [<c011d9db>] [<c01054f4>]
kswapd S C1455FAC 5812 3 1 (L-TLB) 4 2
Call Trace: [<c01111ab>] [<c01110f0>] [<c01116ea>] [<c0127499>] [<c01054f4>]
kreclaimd S 00000286 6316 4 1 (L-TLB) 5 3
Call Trace: [<c0111695>] [<c012754b>] [<c01054f4>]
bdflush S C1450000 5972 5 1 (L-TLB) 6 4
Call Trace: [<c012f97e>] [<c01054f4>]
kupdated S C147FFC8 6296 6 1 (L-TLB) 197 5

And more for other processes.

As far as I can understand lines containing 'Call Trace' are printed in
trap.c in show_trace function. Does anyone know what this thing can mean, and
how to found a real reason?

Problem is that on this machine I have install 2.3.2-ac26 + Morton's patch to
allow very large processes not be killed when there are not reused pages in
swap, etc.

My sci advisor have real problem as his process beying killed when reached
960Mb. There is 256Mb of RAM in machine, and 1.5Gb of swap... It looks like
it is again a problem with kernel does not use all possibilities before kill
a process.

And what worries me is that I found mentioned above lines in kernel log.

--
Sincerely Yours,
Denis Perchine

----------------------------------
E-Mail: dyp@perchine.com
HomePage: http://www.perchine.com/dyp/
FidoNet: 2:5000/120.5
----------------------------------
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:18    [W:0.049 / U:1.316 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site