lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Dec]   [1]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: Did someone try to boot 2.4.16 on a 386 ? [SOLVED]
> But try telling people that shipping files then
> overwriting them is a bad idea.

if a file is to be modified, then it ought to be
copied at make time, deleted at clean time, and
only its copy should be used. Anyway, by definition,
a modified file is not a source anymore.

> The moment you use cp -al on a kernel source tree,
> you are running the risk of time stamp problems.
>
> cp -al pristine tree1
> cp -al pristine tree2
> cd tree1
> make *config bzImage
> cd tree2
> make *config bzImage
>
> The make in tree1 and tree2 touches the time stamps
> on included files. Because most include files are
> hard linked, it changes the time stamps on all three
> trees, including the pristine source. Even if you
> never compile in tree1 and tree2 at the same time,
> when you switch back and forth between trees you
> will get semi-random time stamp changes.

so a recursive touch before a make in such a tree
should be safer ?

> Normally the unwanted time stamp updates only forces
> spurious recompiles, but I believe that there are
> some sequences that create an incomplete kernel
> build.

Although I can't swear I never encountered this
problem, I can tell that I already had some
interrogations about strangely compiled kernels
which led me to repatch against a clean tree.

Regards,
Willy


___________________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!? -- Une adresse @yahoo.fr gratuite et en français !
Yahoo! Courrier : http://courrier.yahoo.fr
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:13    [W:0.033 / U:1.992 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site