lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Nov]   [15]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: 32 Groups Maximum in 2.4
It was a dark and stormy night.  Suddenly
"Jackie Meese" <jackie.m@vt.edu> began to type furiously:

> I've been looking for some time on how to raise the maximum number of
> groups for the 2.4 kernel. I've discovered how to do this kernel, with
> a discussion a few months ago on this
> list.http://www.cs.helsinki.fi/linux/linux-kernel/2001-13/0807.html
>
> However the follow up of "You gotta change the task struct..." means
> nothing to me.
>
> Can someone be more specific as to the changes that need to be made to
> accomplish this? Change the task struct where? I can find lots of
> references to task_struct in the sources simply by grepping them, but I
> can't since any that point to a 32 limit. I'm not a kernel hacker, but
> I've read and edited a fair bit of source code in my time, so I thik I
> just need a bit more of a clue in here.

Look at the file "include/asm-<proc>/param.h to find the symbol "NGROUPS".
Change that to whatever value you like.

The "task_struct" is the per-process descriptor. You can find it in
"/usr/src/linux/include/linux/sched.h", but you shouldn't need to change
anything there.

Once you've changed "NGROUPS", then "make clean oldconfig dep bzImage modules"
as usual. That will change the kernel's idea how how many groups you can have.
You will probably need to recompile the userland stuff, from LIBC to the shells
because "NGROUPS" can be pervasive.

Your mileage may vary.

---------------------------------------------+-----------------------------
Tommy Reynolds | mailto: <reynolds@redhat.com>
Red Hat, Inc., Embedded Development Services | Phone: +1.256.704.9286
307 Wynn Drive NW, Huntsville, AL 35805 USA | FAX: +1.256.837.3839
Senior Software Developer | Mobile: +1.919.641.2923
[unhandled content-type:application/pgp-signature]
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:13    [W:0.044 / U:1.168 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site