lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Oct]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
* Vladimir V. Saveliev wrote on Thursday, 2001-10-11:

> Christian Ullrich wrote:

> > After upgrading from 2.4.10 to 2.4.11, I can no longer
> > mount one particular reiserfs; everything else works fine.
> > The reiserfs in question uses the 3.6 disk format.
> >
> > I get the following messages in syslog:
> >
> > kernel: hdb6: bad access: block=128, count=2
> > kernel: end_request: I/O error, dev 03:46 (hdb), sector 128
> > kernel: read_super_block: bread failed (dev 03:46, block 64, size 1024)
> > kernel: hdb6: bad access: block=16, count=2
> > kernel: end_request: I/O error, dev 03:46 (hdb), sector 16
> > kernel: read_super_block: bread failed (dev 03:46, block 8, size 1024)
> >
> > With 2.4.10, there is no problem, neither before nor after
> > 2.4.11 failed.

> http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v2.4/ChangeLog-2.4.11 says that pre1 and
> pre2 got some block device changes. Although I am not sure they made block
> device driver less persistent.
> Have you tried to run badblocks under 2.4.10 and 2.4.11?

I just did under 2.4.10. No trouble at all.

> Anyway, I would not trust to this hard drive too much.

I tend to trust it. It is not even six months old and has worked
flawlessly until now. And with kernel 2.4.10, it continues to work
flawlessly.
Sure, the messages look a lot like hardware failures. But I think
earlier kernel versions would tell me about hardware read errors
as well, even if they can correct them.

--
Christian Ullrich Registrierter Linux-User #125183

"Sie können nach R'ed'mond fliegen -- aber Sie werden sterben"
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:08    [W:0.100 / U:1.236 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site