lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [Jan]   [5]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
    /
    From
    Date
    SubjectRe: Change of policy for future 2.2 driver submissions


    In other words, there's no longer any such thing as a "stable" branch. The
    whole point of having separate production and development branches was to have
    one in which each succeeding patch could be counted upon to be more reliable
    than the last. If new development is going into the "stable" kernels, then
    there's no way to be certain that the latest patches don't have more bugs than
    the earlier ones, at least not without thoroughly testing them. And if testing
    is necessary, then we might as well just use the development kernels for
    everything, because we have to test them anyway.

    Wayne




    Daniel Phillips <phillips@innominate.de> on 01/05/2001 06:52:00 AM

    To: Mark Hahn <hahn@coffee.psychology.mcmaster.ca>,
    linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
    cc: (bcc: Wayne Brown/Corporate/Altec)

    Subject: Re: Change of policy for future 2.2 driver submissions



    Mark Hahn wrote:
    > > I personaly do not trust the 2.4.x kernel entirely yet, and would prefer to
    > ...
    > > afraid that this may partialy criple 2.2 driver development.
    >
    > egads! how can there be "development" on a *stable* kernel line?
    >
    > maybe this is the time to reconsider terminology/policy:
    > does "stable" mean "bugfixes only"?
    > or does it mean "development kernel for conservatives"?

    It means development kernel for those who don't have enough time to
    debug the main kernel as well as their own project. The stable branch
    tends to be *far* better documented than the bleeding edge branch. Try
    to find documentation on the all-important page cache, for example. It
    makes a whole lot of sense to develop in the stable branch, especially
    for new kernel developers, providing, of course, that the stable branch
    has the basic capabilities you need for your project.

    Alan isn't telling anybody which branch to develop in - he's telling
    people what they have to do if they want their code in his tree. This
    means that when you develop in the stable branch you've got an extra
    step to do at the end of your project: port to the unstable branch.
    This only has to be done once and your code *will* get cleaned up a lot
    in the process. (It's amazing how the prospect of merging 500 lines of
    rejected patch tends to concentrate the mind.) I'd even suggest another
    step after that: port your unstable version back to the stable branch,
    and both versions will be cleaned up.

    --
    Daniel
    -
    To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
    the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
    Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/





    -
    To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
    the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
    Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

    \
     
     \ /
      Last update: 2005-03-22 12:52    [W:0.023 / U:31.008 seconds]
    ©2003-2016 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site