lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2000]   [Sep]   [24]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: Linux kernel 2.2.17 appears not support >512M RAM Disk
Date
From
>Ryan Tokarek writes:
>> On Linux kernel 2.2.17 running on an intel PIII system with 1GB RAM I
>> cannot successfully create a ramdisk of greater than 512MB.
>
>It may be that there is a bug, but I would be interested to know what
>you are really trying to do. Usually bugs like this exist because
>nobody ever tries such things due to reason of sanity... It may be
>you are trying to do something which can better be done another way.

Thanks for your reply.

The reason for this is to store a CD image to be burnt simultaneously to
multiple burners. The burners may not all be of the same speed (though
currently are... 12x), and the number of them may increase. The simplest
way to work around any potential for blazing fast coaster production (we
figured) was to store the image in a RAM disk. This way we are not at the
mercy of Linux disk caching (which may well be perfectly adequate for
this purpose) nor does every instance of cdrecord have to have
obnoxiously large buffers.

This is just one application, and the relevant one to us, but I'm sure
there are others (that are equally uncommon/unusual/useless? :).

Using a ramfs on a 2.4 kernel appears the way to go. This method works
fine for our application and is more efficient than having one large
chunk of memory allocated all the time whether used or not (not that
we're particularly picky about efficiency with a Gig o' RAM machine). As
I understand how the ramfs is used in 2.4, it grows/shrinks dynamically
as needed.

Ryan Tokarek
Unix SysAdmin
Wolfram Research
(not speaking for my employer)
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 12:39    [W:1.689 / U:1.236 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site