lkml.org 
[lkml]   [1996]   [Sep]   [14]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: swapping races

use more swap. your problem will magically go away...


On Thu, 12 Sep 1996, Bruno Haible wrote:

>
> Hi,
>
> Has anyone else observed these kinds of problems during/after heavy
> swapping activity?
>
> 1. Random g++ crashes, which go away as soon as you retry.
> 2. System hang/freeze just after a successful "swapoff -a".
>
> My setup is:
> i486/33, 8 MB RAM, 10 MB swap partition + 7 MB swap file,
> 2 IDE disks, Mitsumi CD-ROM,
> kernel 2.0.6 without networking.
>
> Detailed description:
>
> 1. During compilation of several hundred C++ files, g++ crashes on some
> of them with signal 11 or "internal compiler error". The compilation
> of each of these files needs about 10 to 17 megabytes memory. It swaps
> heavily.
> No way to reproduce the crashes: When "make" is restarted immediately
> afterwards, in the same environment, from the same "bash" process,
> it works fine - but then a similar error occurs a couple of files later.
> Under these circumstances, it doesn't seem to be g++ bug: Even
> the nastiest g++ bugs are usually reproducible.
> It is probably not a hardware problem: Bad RAM? No, gcc compilations
> (which need much less memory, hence rarely swap) don't show up these
> problems. Bad disk? No, I haven't had a single bad sector on these
> disks in 4 years.
>
> This happens with kernel 2.0.6 as well as will 2.0.17.
>
> 2. In a situation where everything should fit in memory. "swapoff -a" goes
> like a breeze, "free" reports no used swap, but then - just a couple
> of seconds later - the mouse freezes, only Ctrl-Alt-+/- still work,
> and another couple of seconds later the system is completely frozen.
> The "swapoff" apparently had bad interaction with the X server.
>
> Bruno
> <haible@ma2s2.mathematik.uni-karlsruhe.de>
>


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:38    [W:0.059 / U:3.624 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site