lkml.org 
[lkml]   [1996]   [Jun]   [14]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: 2.2.0 wishlist
On Thu, 13 Jun 1996, Robert Glamm wrote:

> I still don't think that it should ever be implemented. If you've got
> home dirs on an almost-full disk (i.e., like 99%), you could conceivably
> be ``wasting'' maybe 5, 10, even 20% on undeleted files, and the full disk
> would become a needless annoyance (IMHO :). Does someone
> have stats on how often & what size files are deleted/created/modeified
> in a home directory structure? Almost sounds like a computer science
> master's thesis topic to me.. ;)

A undelete scheme has to be implemented with automatic freeing of
resources. I mean, if the fs needs space, then it has to do some cleanup.
THis is what novell do btw. A daemon should be listening in user space
maybe and must be trigger either at regular interval or by mean of
kerneld or a special device. When signaled, it removes some older deleted
files. Not simple but this is the way it works.

Be aware, that

1-disk space is peanuts these days
2-This is a feature selectable per user if you wish (or per directory)
3-Potentially a mount option could disable it altogether.

I suspect this could be implement in a libc.so stub also with potentially
much more flexibility. For example, it would be possible to control this
behavior

-per user
-per directory
-per application
-per whatever you have in mind

My understanding is that with the new ELF shared libs, it is possible to
install logically a stub dll between the real libc.so and the apps. This
dll can intercept different system call (function call in fact) and
process them differently and ultimatly calling the original.

--------------------------------------------------------
Jacques Gelinas (jacques@solucorp.qc.ca)
Linuxconf: The ultimate administration system for Linux.
sunsite.unc.edu:/pub/Linux/system/Admin/linuxconf-...






\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:37    [W:0.119 / U:3.908 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site