lkml.org 
[lkml]   [1996]   [Jun]   [13]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectNexGen Processors and Linux kernel 2.0
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FROM NEXGEN's WEBSITE's FAQ:

Why is my Nx586 identified by my application or operating system as an 80386, or
some other microprocessor?
A small number of applications attempt to identify a PC's
microprocessor. Occasionally, the processor is identified incorrectly.
Most often, the incorrect CPU ID results simply in a display of the wrong
CPU type. In some cases, an Nx586 processor may be misidentified as an
80386. The NexGen CPU ID page provides more detailed discussion of CPU
ID issues and resolutions.

The NexGen CPU ID page's URL is:
http://www.nexgen.com/support/pscpuid.htm
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello there!

I run a Linux server, transient.net. Currently I use kernel 1.2.13,
though from time to time I've considered the 1.3.*'s. When 2.0.0 came out,
I finished updating my system (got gcc-2.7.2, the new libc everything).
I went through the configuration and installation process. I had it 'make
zdisk', because my system only boots from floppy (and I didn't want to
trash the current kernel) (lilo doesn't really like my Western Digital
EIDE 1.2 Gig Drive, and I've never really cared. I don't boot that oftern
anyways, and I use my floppy drive even less often).

The compilation went fine. In the configuration, I specified [P]entium,
because I have a NexGen586/90, that can do everything that a Pentium can.
I normally (when compiling things) use GCC's -m486, and have no problems
(and get faster programs).

Things we not good though. I booted from the floppy... It uncompressed
the kernel... and then died saying that this is a 386, and the kernel has
been optimized for a 486 or faster. Giving up...

Now, my older (1.2.13) kernel was also -m486 optimized, but It never had
a problem. I had been aware that sometimes the chip gave false readings,
but heard it was harmless. uname -a likes to indicate that I have an i386.
Which is not that big a deal.

I am mailing this to the linux-kernel mailing-list to make the kernel
developers (developer) aware of this problem, with the hopes that it may
be fixed, or patched, or what not (though I know you had hopes of not
having to go beyond 2.0.0 into 2.0.1, and I also don't know if this
justifies a full patch... however, I, and probably most NexGen owners
(there are a bunch) would rather not have to use a sub-optimized kernel
2, when 1.2.13 lets you optimize...

I am mailing this to the GCC-bugs list to let them know of this problem,
because although it is not a specific error of GCC's, it could be useful
to implement a warning or change some of the code to route around this
problem. NexGen has some sample code for fixing this problem, at the
above url.

Thanks to EVERYONE for reading this message. If this generates any
response, activity, complaints, if you could cc them (or mail them) to
dmv@cybercom.net, it would be appreciated.

Free Software is great. Its great to be able to just rut through the
source to a BEAUTIFUL operating system, or pretty much any of the
applications. And, if something goes wrong, there is a network of people,
while not paid to answer or fix things, to assist you. You dont quite get
that with Microsoft.

dMv



\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:37    [W:0.062 / U:0.968 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site