lkml.org 
[lkml]   [1996]   [May]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: ideas
On Mon, 6 May 1996, Brian M Grunkemeyer wrote:

> Excerpts from internet.computing.linux-kernel: 5-May-96 Re: ideas by
> Alan Cox@lxorguk.ukuu.or
> > C++ code is currently slower and has buggier output than well written C (
> > especially as certain people bother to peek at the assembler output). Unless
> > the g++ walking volatile bug has finally been fixed its also not
> > usable. Finally g++ eats memory - forget building on an 8Mb machine with g++
>
> Ok, those are good temporary reasons to not use C++. Those problems
> should improve or eliminate themselves over time, when we might want to
> change our minds. But until then, how about making the kernel
> _compilable_ under C++? The advantages in the stronger type checking
> alone should be more than enough reason to periodically compile the
> kernel w/ g++ to make sure there aren't any subtle type errors. In a
> project like this where everyone's submitting patches randomly, it is a
> good safety measure. There's even a chance it could improve some code
> by pointing out which parameters weren't used in a function. While it
> doesn't guarantee good code, it does prevent sloppy code from causing
> problems.
>
Why not do what I do when I wanna be paranoid about type checking and
other pedanticities and compile with -Wall, redirect it to a file, and
then go hack it till it compiles without any warnings of any kind?

(Or, under SunOS 4.x, -Wall -Wno-implicit, because the system header
files include *no prototypes!* Go figure...)

--
J. Sean Connell Systems Software Analyst, ICONZ
diamond@canuck.gen.nz "Oh life is a glorious cycle of song,
diamond@iconz.co.nz a medley of extemporanea,
#include <stddisc.h> And love is a thing that can never go wrong...
And I'm Queen Marie of Romania."
I *hate* Sun Type 4 kbs! --Dorothy Parker



\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:37    [W:0.246 / U:2.264 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site