lkml.org 
[lkml]   [1996]   [Oct]   [22]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectMemory upgrade causes slowdown; why?
Date
OK I know this is just about a faq now, but can somebody please refresh
my memory?

I just upgraded my system from 16 megs to 32 megs, and now Linux crawls
(so bad that I took the new SIMM back out, temporarily I hope!) X takes
2 or 3 times as long to start up, kernel builds take longer, that sort of
thing. I remember somebody else asking that question and getting an
answer sometime in the last few months...

The problem affects NT 4.0 too (which I have on my other partition) so
I'm suspecting there's a fishy hardware problem rather than a config
problem, but then again maybe not...after all NT always crawls relative
to Linux (I was only hoping for a bit more stability than with Win95).

I'm running Slackware 3.1 on a 486DX4-100 system. It has 2 72-pin SIMM
slots, and I believe both SIMMs are 60-ns but they are different brands.
Both are also non-parity, non-EDO. I tried upgrading to 2.0.22 to see
if there was a difference, but otherwise it's stock slackware. I also
tried running it with each of the SIMMs, and it's just as fast with either
one, but it is slow with both, regardless which slots I put them in.

I'm aware of the build option to make it ignore all but the lowest 16 megs.
I'm also aware of being able to pass a memory parameter to the kernel
via lilo, but that seems irrelevant in that the memory is detected
properly, and I can see it getting used in Xosview as I start up apps,
but the CPU meter in Xosview seems pegged a lot more than it does
with 16 megs installed.

--
_______ KB7PWD @ KC7Y.AZ.US.NOAM ecloud@goodnet.com
(_ | |_) Shawn T. Rutledge on the web: http://www.goodnet.com/~ecloud
__) | | \__________________________________________________________________
* Linux * PIC * Star Trek * VRML * ARS * let freedom ring * virtual reality *

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:38    [W:0.067 / U:0.284 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site