lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2018]   [Jun]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH] mremap: Increase LATENCY_LIMIT of mremap to reduce the number of TLB shootdowns
From
Date
Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net> wrote:

> Commit 5d1904204c99 ("mremap: fix race between mremap() and page cleanning")
> fixed races between mremap and other operations for both file-backed and
> anonymous mappings. The file-backed was the most critical as it allowed the
> possibility that data could be changed on a physical page after page_mkclean
> returned which could trigger data loss or data integrity issues. A customer
> reported that the cost of the TLBs for anonymous regressions was excessive
> and resulting in a 30-50% drop in performance overall since this commit
> on a microbenchmark. Unfortunately I neither have access to the test-case
> nor can I describe what it does other than saying that mremap operations
> dominate heavily.
>
> This patch increases the LATENCY_LIMIT to handle TLB flushes on a
> PMD boundary instead of every 64 pages. This reduces the number of TLB
> shootdowns by a factor of 8 which is not reported to completely restore
> performance but gets it within an acceptable percentage. The given metric
> here is simply described as "higher is better".
>
> Baseline that was known good
> 002: Metric: 91.05
> 004: Metric: 109.45
> 008: Metric: 73.08
> 016: Metric: 58.14
> 032: Metric: 61.09
> 064: Metric: 57.76
> 128: Metric: 55.43
>
> Current
> 001: Metric: 54.98
> 002: Metric: 56.56
> 004: Metric: 41.22
> 008: Metric: 35.96
> 016: Metric: 36.45
> 032: Metric: 35.71
> 064: Metric: 35.73
> 128: Metric: 34.96
>
> With patch
> 001: Metric: 61.43
> 002: Metric: 81.64
> 004: Metric: 67.92
> 008: Metric: 51.67
> 016: Metric: 50.47
> 032: Metric: 52.29
> 064: Metric: 50.01
> 128: Metric: 49.04
>
> So for low threads, it's not restored but for larger number of threads,
> it's closer to the "known good" baseline. The downside is that PTL lock
> hold times will be slightly higher but it's unlikely that an mremap and
> another operation will contend on the same PMD. This is the first time I
> encountered a realistic workload that was mremap intensive (thousands of
> calls per second with small ranges dominating).
>
> Using a different mremap-intensive workload that is not representative of
> the real workload there is little difference observed outside of noise in
> the headline metrics However, the TLB shootdowns are reduced by 11% on
> average and at the peak, TLB shootdowns were reduced by 21%. Interrupts
> were sampled every second while the workload ran to get those figures.
> It's known that the figures will vary as the non-representative load is
> non-deterministic.
>
> An alternative patch was posted that should have significantly reduced the
> TLB flushes but unfortunately it does not perform as well as this version
> on the customer test case. If revisited, the two patches can stack on top
> of each other.
>
> Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.com>
> ---
> mm/mremap.c | 2 +-
> 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)
>
> diff --git a/mm/mremap.c b/mm/mremap.c
> index 049470aa1e3e..b5017cb2e1e9 100644
> --- a/mm/mremap.c
> +++ b/mm/mremap.c
> @@ -191,7 +191,7 @@ static void move_ptes(struct vm_area_struct *vma, pmd_t *old_pmd,
> drop_rmap_locks(vma);
> }
>
> -#define LATENCY_LIMIT (64 * PAGE_SIZE)
> +#define LATENCY_LIMIT (PMD_SIZE)
>
> unsigned long move_page_tables(struct vm_area_struct *vma,
> unsigned long old_addr, struct vm_area_struct *new_vma,

This LATENCY_LIMIT is only used in move_page_tables() in the following
manner:

next = (new_addr + PMD_SIZE) & PMD_MASK;
if (extent > next - new_addr)
extent = next - new_addr;
if (extent > LATENCY_LIMIT)
extent = LATENCY_LIMIT;

If LATENCY_LIMIT is to be changed to PMD_SIZE, then IIUC the last condition
is not required, and LATENCY_LIMIT can just be removed (assuming there is no
underflow case that hides somewhere).

No?

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2018-06-06 17:55    [W:0.037 / U:17.852 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site