lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Sep]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH net-next 2/3] net: ethernet: socionext: add AVE ethernet driver
> +static int ave_mdio_busywait(struct net_device *ndev)
> +{
> + int ret = 1, loop = 100;
> + u32 mdiosr;
> +
> + /* wait until completion */
> + while (1) {
> + mdiosr = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_MDIOSR);
> + if (!(mdiosr & AVE_MDIOSR_STS))
> + break;
> +
> + usleep_range(10, 20);
> + if (!loop--) {
> + netdev_err(ndev,
> + "failed to read from MDIO (status:0x%08x)\n",
> + mdiosr);
> + ret = 0;

ETIMEDOUT would be better.

> + break;
> + }
> + }
> +
> + return ret;

and then return 0 on success. That is the normal convention for return
values. An error code, and 0.

> +static int ave_mdiobus_write(struct mii_bus *bus,
> + int phyid, int regnum, u16 val)
> +{
> + struct net_device *ndev = bus->priv;
> + u32 mdioctl;
> +
> + /* write address */
> + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_MDIOAR, (phyid << 8) | regnum);
> +
> + /* write data */
> + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_MDIOWDR, val);
> +
> + /* write request */
> + mdioctl = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_MDIOCTR);
> + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_MDIOCTR, mdioctl | AVE_MDIOCTR_WREQ);
> +
> + if (!ave_mdio_busywait(ndev)) {
> + netdev_err(ndev, "phy-%d reg-%x write failed\n",
> + phyid, regnum);
> + return -1;

If ave_mdio_busywait() returns ETIMEDOUT, you can just return
it. Returning -1 is not good.

> + }
> +
> + return 0;
> +}
> +
> +static irqreturn_t ave_interrupt(int irq, void *netdev)
> +{
> + struct net_device *ndev = (struct net_device *)netdev;
> + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> + u32 gimr_val, gisr_val;
> +
> + gimr_val = ave_irq_disable_all(ndev);
> +
> + /* get interrupt status */
> + gisr_val = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_GISR);
> +
> + /* PHY */
> + if (gisr_val & AVE_GI_PHY) {
> + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_GISR, AVE_GI_PHY);
> + if (priv->internal_phy_interrupt)
> + phy_mac_interrupt(ndev->phydev, ndev->phydev->link);

Humm. I don't think this is correct. You are supposed to give it the
new link state, not the old.

What does a PHY interrupt mean here?

> +static void ave_adjust_link(struct net_device *ndev)
> +{
> + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> + struct phy_device *phydev = ndev->phydev;
> + u32 val, txcr, rxcr, rxcr_org;
> +
> + /* set RGMII speed */
> + val = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_TXCR);
> + val &= ~(AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_100 | AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_1G);
> +
> + if (priv->phy_mode == PHY_INTERFACE_MODE_RGMII &&
> + phydev->speed == SPEED_1000)

phy_interface_mode_is_rgmii(), so that you handle all the RGMII modes.

> + val |= AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_1G;
> + else if (phydev->speed == SPEED_100)
> + val |= AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_100;
> +
> + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_TXCR, val);
> +
> + /* set RMII speed (100M/10M only) */
> + if (priv->phy_mode != PHY_INTERFACE_MODE_RGMII) {

Not so safe. It would be better to check for the modes you actually
support.

> + if (phydev->link)
> + netif_carrier_on(ndev);
> + else
> + netif_carrier_off(ndev);

I don't think you need this. The phylib should do it for you.

> +
> + phy_print_status(phydev);
> +}
> +
> +static int ave_init(struct net_device *ndev)
> +{
> + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> + struct device *dev = ndev->dev.parent;
> + struct device_node *phy_node, *np = dev->of_node;
> + struct phy_device *phydev;
> + const void *mac_addr;
> + u32 supported;
> +
> + /* get mac address */
> + mac_addr = of_get_mac_address(np);
> + if (mac_addr)
> + ether_addr_copy(ndev->dev_addr, mac_addr);
> +
> + /* if the mac address is invalid, use random mac address */
> + if (!is_valid_ether_addr(ndev->dev_addr)) {
> + eth_hw_addr_random(ndev);
> + dev_warn(dev, "Using random MAC address: %pM\n",
> + ndev->dev_addr);
> + }
> +
> + /* attach PHY with MAC */
> + phy_node = of_get_next_available_child(np, NULL);

???

Should this not be looking for a phy-handle property?
Documentation/devicetree/binds/net/ethernet.txt:

- phy-handle: phandle, specifies a reference to a node representing a PHY
device; this property is described in the Devicetree Specification and so
preferred;


> + phydev = of_phy_connect(ndev, phy_node,
> + ave_adjust_link, 0, priv->phy_mode);
> + if (!phydev) {
> + dev_err(dev, "could not attach to PHY\n");
> + return -ENODEV;
> + }
> + of_node_put(phy_node);
> +
> + priv->phydev = phydev;
> + phydev->autoneg = AUTONEG_ENABLE;
> + phydev->speed = 0;
> + phydev->duplex = 0;

And this should not be needed.

> +
> + dev_info(dev, "connected to %s phy with id 0x%x\n",
> + phydev->drv->name, phydev->phy_id);

phy_attached_info()

> +
> + if (priv->phy_mode != PHY_INTERFACE_MODE_RGMII) {

Same comment as above.

> + supported = phydev->supported;
> + phydev->supported &= ~PHY_GBIT_FEATURES;
> + phydev->supported |= supported & PHY_BASIC_FEATURES;
> + }
> +
> + /* PHY interrupt stop instruction is needed because the interrupt
> + * continues to assert.
> + */
> + phy_stop_interrupts(phydev);

Could you explain this some more? It sounds like your interrupt
controller is broken.

> +
> + /* When PHY driver can't handle its interrupt directly,
> + * interrupt request always fails and polling method is used
> + * alternatively. In this case, the libphy says
> + * "libphy: uniphier-mdio: Can't get IRQ -1 (PHY)".
> + */
> + phy_start_interrupts(phydev);

-1 is PHY_POLL. So calling phy_start_interrupts() is wrong. In fact,
you should not be calling phy_start_interrupts() at all. No other
Ethernet driver does.

> +
> + phy_start_aneg(phydev);
> +
> + return 0;
> +}
> +
> +static void ave_uninit(struct net_device *ndev)
> +{
> + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> +
> + phy_stop_interrupts(priv->phydev);

And no other Ethernet driver calls phy_stop_interrupts either.
Please take a look at this.

> + phy_disconnect(priv->phydev);
> +}
> +

Andrew

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-09-08 15:52    [W:0.151 / U:0.140 seconds]
©2003-2017 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site