lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Sep]   [5]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [v7 2/5] mm, oom: cgroup-aware OOM killer
On Tue, Sep 05, 2017 at 04:57:00PM +0200, Michal Hocko wrote:
> On Mon 04-09-17 15:21:05, Roman Gushchin wrote:
> [...]
> > diff --git a/mm/memcontrol.c b/mm/memcontrol.c
> > index a69d23082abf..97813c56163b 100644
> > --- a/mm/memcontrol.c
> > +++ b/mm/memcontrol.c
> > @@ -2649,6 +2649,213 @@ static inline bool memcg_has_children(struct mem_cgroup *memcg)
> > return ret;
> > }
> >
> > +static long memcg_oom_badness(struct mem_cgroup *memcg,
> > + const nodemask_t *nodemask)
> > +{
> > + long points = 0;
> > + int nid;
> > + pg_data_t *pgdat;
> > +
> > + for_each_node_state(nid, N_MEMORY) {
> > + if (nodemask && !node_isset(nid, *nodemask))
> > + continue;
> > +
> > + points += mem_cgroup_node_nr_lru_pages(memcg, nid,
> > + LRU_ALL_ANON | BIT(LRU_UNEVICTABLE));
>
> Why don't you consider file LRUs here? What if there is a lot of page
> cache which is not reclaimed because it is protected by memcg->low.
> Should we hide that from the OOM killer?

I'm not sure here.
I agree with your argument, although memcg->low should not cause OOMs
in the current implementation (which is a separate problem).
Also I can imagine some edge cases with mlocked pagecache belonging
to a process from a different cgroup.

I would suggest to refine this later.

>
> [...]
> > +static void select_victim_memcg(struct mem_cgroup *root, struct oom_control *oc)
> > +{
> > + struct mem_cgroup *iter, *parent;
> > +
> > + for_each_mem_cgroup_tree(iter, root) {
> > + if (memcg_has_children(iter)) {
> > + iter->oom_score = 0;
> > + continue;
> > + }
>
> Do we really need this check? If it is a mere optimization then
> we should probably check for tasks in the memcg rather than
> descendant. More on that below.

The idea is to traverse memcg only once: we're resetting oom_score
for non-leaf cgroups, and for each leaf cgroup calculate the score
and propagate it upwards.

>
> > +
> > + iter->oom_score = oom_evaluate_memcg(iter, oc->nodemask);
> > +
> > + /*
> > + * Ignore empty and non-eligible memory cgroups.
> > + */
> > + if (iter->oom_score == 0)
> > + continue;
> > +
> > + /*
> > + * If there are inflight OOM victims, we don't need to look
> > + * further for new victims.
> > + */
> > + if (iter->oom_score == -1) {
> > + oc->chosen_memcg = INFLIGHT_VICTIM;
> > + mem_cgroup_iter_break(root, iter);
> > + return;
> > + }
> > +
> > + for (parent = parent_mem_cgroup(iter); parent && parent != root;
> > + parent = parent_mem_cgroup(parent))
> > + parent->oom_score += iter->oom_score;
>
> Hmm. The changelog says "By default, it will look for the biggest leaf
> cgroup, and kill the largest task inside." But you are accumulating
> oom_score up the hierarchy and so parents will have higher score than
> the layer of their children and the larger the sub-hierarchy the more
> biased it will become. Say you have
> root
> /\
> / \
> A D
> / \
> B C
>
> B (5), C(15) thus A(20) and D(20). Unless I am missing something we are
> going to go down A path and then chose C even though D is the largest
> leaf group, right?

You're right, changelog is not accurate, I'll fix it.
The behavior is correct, IMO.

>
> > + }
> > +
> > + for (;;) {
> > + struct cgroup_subsys_state *css;
> > + struct mem_cgroup *memcg = NULL;
> > + long score = LONG_MIN;
> > +
> > + css_for_each_child(css, &root->css) {
> > + struct mem_cgroup *iter = mem_cgroup_from_css(css);
> > +
> > + /*
> > + * Ignore empty and non-eligible memory cgroups.
> > + */
> > + if (iter->oom_score == 0)
> > + continue;
> > +
> > + if (iter->oom_score > score) {
> > + memcg = iter;
> > + score = iter->oom_score;
> > + }
> > + }
> > +
> > + if (!memcg) {
> > + if (oc->memcg && root == oc->memcg) {
> > + oc->chosen_memcg = oc->memcg;
> > + css_get(&oc->chosen_memcg->css);
> > + oc->chosen_points = oc->memcg->oom_score;
> > + }
> > + break;
> > + }
> > +
> > + if (memcg->oom_group || !memcg_has_children(memcg)) {
> > + oc->chosen_memcg = memcg;
> > + css_get(&oc->chosen_memcg->css);
> > + oc->chosen_points = score;
> > + break;
> > + }
> > +
> > + root = memcg;
> > + }
> > +}
> > +
> [...]
> > + /*
> > + * For system-wide OOMs we should consider tasks in the root cgroup
> > + * with oom_score larger than oc->chosen_points.
> > + */
> > + if (!oc->memcg) {
> > + select_victim_root_cgroup_task(oc);
>
> I do not understand why do we have to handle root cgroup specially here.
> select_victim_memcg already iterates all memcgs in the oom hierarchy
> (including root) so if the root memcg is the largest one then we
> should simply consider it no?

We don't have necessary stats for the root cgroup, so we can't calculate
it's oom_score.

> You are skipping root there because of
> memcg_has_children but I suspect this and the whole accumulate up the
> hierarchy approach just makes the whole thing more complex than necessary. With
> "tasks only in leafs" cgroup policy we should only see any pages on LRUs
> on the global root memcg and leaf cgroups. The same applies to memcg
> stats. So why cannot we simply do the tree walk, calculate
> badness/check the priority and select the largest memcg in one go?

We have to traverse from top to bottom to make priority-based decision,
but size-based oom_score is calculated as sum of descending leaf cgroup scores.

For example:
root
/\
/ \
A D
/ \
B C
A and D have same priorities, B has larger priority than C.

In this case we need to calculate size-based score for A, which requires
summing oom_score of the sub-tree (B an C), despite we don't need it
for choosing between B and C.

Maybe I don't see it, but I don't know how to implement it more optimal.

>
> > @@ -810,6 +810,9 @@ static void __oom_kill_process(struct task_struct *victim)
> > struct mm_struct *mm;
> > bool can_oom_reap = true;
> >
> > + if (is_global_init(victim) || (victim->flags & PF_KTHREAD))
> > + return;
> > +
>
> This will leak a reference to the victim AFACS

Good catch!
I didn't fix this after moving reference dropping into __oom_kill_process().
Fixed.

Thanks!

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-09-05 22:24    [W:0.157 / U:2.976 seconds]
©2003-2017 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site