lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Sep]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH net-next 2/3] net: ethernet: socionext: add AVE ethernet driver
Hi Andrew,
Thank you for your comments.

On Fri, 8 Sep 2017 15:50:30 +0200 <andrew@lunn.ch> wrote:

> > +static int ave_mdio_busywait(struct net_device *ndev)
> > +{
> > + int ret = 1, loop = 100;
> > + u32 mdiosr;
> > +
> > + /* wait until completion */
> > + while (1) {
> > + mdiosr = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_MDIOSR);
> > + if (!(mdiosr & AVE_MDIOSR_STS))
> > + break;
> > +
> > + usleep_range(10, 20);
> > + if (!loop--) {
> > + netdev_err(ndev,
> > + "failed to read from MDIO (status:0x%08x)\n",
> > + mdiosr);
> > + ret = 0;
>
> ETIMEDOUT would be better.

I see. I'll use this.

> > + break;
> > + }
> > + }
> > +
> > + return ret;
>
> and then return 0 on success. That is the normal convention for return
> values. An error code, and 0.

Surely, it's desiable to return zero and error code.

> > +static int ave_mdiobus_write(struct mii_bus *bus,
> > + int phyid, int regnum, u16 val)
> > +{
> > + struct net_device *ndev = bus->priv;
> > + u32 mdioctl;
> > +
> > + /* write address */
> > + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_MDIOAR, (phyid << 8) | regnum);
> > +
> > + /* write data */
> > + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_MDIOWDR, val);
> > +
> > + /* write request */
> > + mdioctl = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_MDIOCTR);
> > + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_MDIOCTR, mdioctl | AVE_MDIOCTR_WREQ);
> > +
> > + if (!ave_mdio_busywait(ndev)) {
> > + netdev_err(ndev, "phy-%d reg-%x write failed\n",
> > + phyid, regnum);
> > + return -1;
>
> If ave_mdio_busywait() returns ETIMEDOUT, you can just return
> it. Returning -1 is not good.

Indeed. I'll re-consider handling return value.

> > + }
> > +
> > + return 0;
> > +}
> > +
> > +static irqreturn_t ave_interrupt(int irq, void *netdev)
> > +{
> > + struct net_device *ndev = (struct net_device *)netdev;
> > + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> > + u32 gimr_val, gisr_val;
> > +
> > + gimr_val = ave_irq_disable_all(ndev);
> > +
> > + /* get interrupt status */
> > + gisr_val = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_GISR);
> > +
> > + /* PHY */
> > + if (gisr_val & AVE_GI_PHY) {
> > + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_GISR, AVE_GI_PHY);
> > + if (priv->internal_phy_interrupt)
> > + phy_mac_interrupt(ndev->phydev, ndev->phydev->link);
>
> Humm. I don't think this is correct. You are supposed to give it the
> new link state, not the old.
>
> What does a PHY interrupt mean here?

In the general case, I think PHY events like changing link state are transmitted
to CPU as interrupt via interrupt controller, then PHY driver itself can handle
the interrupt.

And in this case, PHY events are transmitted to MAC as one of its interrupt factor,
then I thought that MAC driver had to tell the events to PHY.

> > +static void ave_adjust_link(struct net_device *ndev)
> > +{
> > + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> > + struct phy_device *phydev = ndev->phydev;
> > + u32 val, txcr, rxcr, rxcr_org;
> > +
> > + /* set RGMII speed */
> > + val = ave_r32(ndev, AVE_TXCR);
> > + val &= ~(AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_100 | AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_1G);
> > +
> > + if (priv->phy_mode == PHY_INTERFACE_MODE_RGMII &&
> > + phydev->speed == SPEED_1000)
>
> phy_interface_mode_is_rgmii(), so that you handle all the RGMII modes.

It's convenient. I'll replace it.

> > + val |= AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_1G;
> > + else if (phydev->speed == SPEED_100)
> > + val |= AVE_TXCR_TXSPD_100;
> > +
> > + ave_w32(ndev, AVE_TXCR, val);
> > +
> > + /* set RMII speed (100M/10M only) */
> > + if (priv->phy_mode != PHY_INTERFACE_MODE_RGMII) {
>
> Not so safe. It would be better to check for the modes you actually
> support.

Indeed. This part has to check if the specified mode is supported accurately.

> > + if (phydev->link)
> > + netif_carrier_on(ndev);
> > + else
> > + netif_carrier_off(ndev);
>
> I don't think you need this. The phylib should do it for you.

Okay. I'll remove it.

> > +
> > + phy_print_status(phydev);
> > +}
> > +
> > +static int ave_init(struct net_device *ndev)
> > +{
> > + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> > + struct device *dev = ndev->dev.parent;
> > + struct device_node *phy_node, *np = dev->of_node;
> > + struct phy_device *phydev;
> > + const void *mac_addr;
> > + u32 supported;
> > +
> > + /* get mac address */
> > + mac_addr = of_get_mac_address(np);
> > + if (mac_addr)
> > + ether_addr_copy(ndev->dev_addr, mac_addr);
> > +
> > + /* if the mac address is invalid, use random mac address */
> > + if (!is_valid_ether_addr(ndev->dev_addr)) {
> > + eth_hw_addr_random(ndev);
> > + dev_warn(dev, "Using random MAC address: %pM\n",
> > + ndev->dev_addr);
> > + }
> > +
> > + /* attach PHY with MAC */
> > + phy_node = of_get_next_available_child(np, NULL);
>
> ???
>
> Should this not be looking for a phy-handle property?
> Documentation/devicetree/binds/net/ethernet.txt:
>
> - phy-handle: phandle, specifies a reference to a node representing a PHY
> device; this property is described in the Devicetree Specification and so
> preferred;

Yes, I found it was wrong.
The device node has not a child node but phy-handle to specify PHY.

> > + phydev = of_phy_connect(ndev, phy_node,
> > + ave_adjust_link, 0, priv->phy_mode);
> > + if (!phydev) {
> > + dev_err(dev, "could not attach to PHY\n");
> > + return -ENODEV;
> > + }
> > + of_node_put(phy_node);
> > +
> > + priv->phydev = phydev;
> > + phydev->autoneg = AUTONEG_ENABLE;
> > + phydev->speed = 0;
> > + phydev->duplex = 0;
>
> And this should not be needed.

I understand that these parameters have been initialized.

> > +
> > + dev_info(dev, "connected to %s phy with id 0x%x\n",
> > + phydev->drv->name, phydev->phy_id);
>
> phy_attached_info()

It's convernient.

> > +
> > + if (priv->phy_mode != PHY_INTERFACE_MODE_RGMII) {
>
> Same comment as above.

Ditto.

> > + supported = phydev->supported;
> > + phydev->supported &= ~PHY_GBIT_FEATURES;
> > + phydev->supported |= supported & PHY_BASIC_FEATURES;
> > + }
> > +
> > + /* PHY interrupt stop instruction is needed because the interrupt
> > + * continues to assert.
> > + */
> > + phy_stop_interrupts(phydev);
>
> Could you explain this some more? It sounds like your interrupt
> controller is broken.

I thought that the driver had to stop the own interrupt of PHY device
because it might be already enabled.
But surely we don't think of such a case.

> > +
> > + /* When PHY driver can't handle its interrupt directly,
> > + * interrupt request always fails and polling method is used
> > + * alternatively. In this case, the libphy says
> > + * "libphy: uniphier-mdio: Can't get IRQ -1 (PHY)".
> > + */
> > + phy_start_interrupts(phydev);
>
> -1 is PHY_POLL. So calling phy_start_interrupts() is wrong. In fact,
> you should not be calling phy_start_interrupts() at all. No other
> Ethernet driver does.

The phy_start_interrupts() calls request_threaded_irq(), and it wll succeed
when PHY node has own 'interrupts' property.
In this case, it will fail and phydev->irq sets PHY_POLL.

However, phydev->irq is initialized PHY_POLL in phy_probe(),
surely it isn't necessary.

> > +
> > + phy_start_aneg(phydev);
> > +
> > + return 0;
> > +}
> > +
> > +static void ave_uninit(struct net_device *ndev)
> > +{
> > + struct ave_private *priv = netdev_priv(ndev);
> > +
> > + phy_stop_interrupts(priv->phydev);
>
> And no other Ethernet driver calls phy_stop_interrupts either.
> Please take a look at this.

I see. I'll check it.

>
> > + phy_disconnect(priv->phydev);
> > +}
> > +
>
> Andrew

---
Best Regards,
Kunihiko Hayashi


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-09-11 08:51    [W:0.093 / U:11.196 seconds]
©2003-2017 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site