lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Apr]   [20]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: Performance of low-cpu utilisation benchmark regressed severely since 4.6
Date
On Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:02:34 AM Mel Gorman wrote:
> On Mon, Apr 10, 2017 at 10:51:38PM +0200, Rafael J. Wysocki wrote:
> > Hi Mel,
> >
> > On Mon, Apr 10, 2017 at 10:41 AM, Mel Gorman
> > <mgorman@techsingularity.net> wrote:
> > > Hi Rafael,
> > >
> > > Since kernel 4.6, performance of the low CPU intensity workloads was dropped
> > > severely. netperf UDP_STREAM has about 15-20% CPU utilisation has regressed
> > > about 10% relative to 4.4 anad about 6-9% running TCP_STREAM. sockperf has
> > > similar utilisation fixes but I won't go into these in detail as they were
> > > running loopback and are sensitive to a lot of factors.
> > >
> > > It's far more obvious when looking at the git test suite and the length
> > > of time it takes to run. This is a shellscript and git intensive workload
> > > whose CPU utilisatiion is very low but is less sensitive to multiple
> > > factors than netperf and sockperf.
> >
> > First, thanks for the data.
> >
> > Nobody has reported anything similar to these results so far.
> >
>
> It's possible that it's due to the CPU being IvyBridge or it may be due
> to the fact that people don't spot problems with low CPU utilisation
> workloads.

I'm guessing the latter.

> > > Bisection indicates that the regression started with commit ffb810563c0c
> > > ("intel_pstate: Avoid getting stuck in high P-states when idle"). However,
> > > it's no longer the only relevant commit as the following results will show
> >
> > Well, that was an attempt to salvage the "Core" P-state selection
> > algorithm which is problematic overall and reverting this now would
> > reintroduce the issue addressed by it, unfortunately.
> >
>
> I'm not suggesting that we should revert this patch. I accept that it
> would reintroduce the regression reported by Jorg if nothing else

OK

> > > This is showing the user and system CPU usage as well as the elapsed time
> > > to run a single iteration of the git test suite with total times at bottom
> > > report. Overall time takes over 3 hours longer moving from 4.4 to 4.11-rc5
> > > and reverting the commit does not fully address the problem. It's doing
> > > a warmup run whose results are discarded and then 5 iterations.
> > >
> > > The test shows it took 2018 seconds on average to complete a single iteration
> > > on 4.4 and 3750 seconds to complete on 4.11-rc5. The major drop is between
> > > 4.5 and 4.6 where it went from 1830 seconds to 3703 seconds and has not
> > > recovered. A bisection was clean and pointed to the commit mentioned above.
> > >
> > > The results show that it's not the only source as a revert (last column)
> > > doesn't fix the damage although it goes from 3750 seconds (4.11-rc5 vanilla)
> > > to 2919 seconds (with a revert).
> >
> > OK
> >
> > So if you revert the commit in question on top of 4.6.0, the numbers
> > go back to the 4.5.0 levels, right?
> >
>
> Not quite, it restores a lot of the performance but not all.

I see.

> > Anyway, as I said the "Core" P-state selection algorithm is sort of on
> > the way out and I think that we have a reasonable replacement for it.
> >
> > Would it be viable to check what happens with
> > https://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/9640261/ applied? Depending on the
> > ACPI system PM profile of the test machine, this is likely to cause it
> > to use the new algo.
> >
>
> Yes. The following is a comparison using 4.5 as a baseline as it is the
> best known kernel and it reduces the width
>
>
> gitsource
> 4.5.0 4.6.0 4.6.0 4.11.0-rc5 4.11.0-rc5
> vanilla vanilla revert-v4.6-v1r1 vanilla loadbased-v1r1
> User min 1613.72 ( 0.00%) 3302.19 (-104.63%) 1935.46 (-19.94%) 3487.46 (-116.11%) 2296.87 (-42.33%)
> User mean 1616.47 ( 0.00%) 3304.14 (-104.40%) 1937.83 (-19.88%) 3488.12 (-115.79%) 2299.33 (-42.24%)
> User stddev 1.75 ( 0.00%) 1.12 ( 36.06%) 1.42 ( 18.54%) 0.57 ( 67.28%) 1.79 ( -2.73%)
> User coeffvar 0.11 ( 0.00%) 0.03 ( 68.72%) 0.07 ( 32.05%) 0.02 ( 84.84%) 0.08 ( 27.78%)
> User max 1618.73 ( 0.00%) 3305.40 (-104.20%) 1939.84 (-19.84%) 3489.01 (-115.54%) 2302.01 (-42.21%)
> System min 202.58 ( 0.00%) 407.51 (-101.16%) 244.03 (-20.46%) 269.92 (-33.24%) 203.79 ( -0.60%)
> System mean 203.62 ( 0.00%) 408.38 (-100.56%) 245.24 (-20.44%) 270.83 (-33.01%) 205.19 ( -0.77%)
> System stddev 0.64 ( 0.00%) 0.77 (-21.25%) 0.97 (-52.52%) 0.59 ( 7.31%) 0.75 (-18.12%)
> System coeffvar 0.31 ( 0.00%) 0.19 ( 39.54%) 0.40 (-26.64%) 0.22 ( 30.31%) 0.37 (-17.21%)
> System max 204.36 ( 0.00%) 409.81 (-100.53%) 246.85 (-20.79%) 271.56 (-32.88%) 206.06 ( -0.83%)
> Elapsed min 1827.70 ( 0.00%) 3701.00 (-102.49%) 2186.22 (-19.62%) 3749.00 (-105.12%) 2501.05 (-36.84%)
> Elapsed mean 1830.72 ( 0.00%) 3703.20 (-102.28%) 2190.03 (-19.63%) 3750.20 (-104.85%) 2503.27 (-36.74%)
> Elapsed stddev 2.18 ( 0.00%) 1.47 ( 32.67%) 2.25 ( -3.23%) 0.75 ( 65.72%) 1.28 ( 41.43%)
> Elapsed coeffvar 0.12 ( 0.00%) 0.04 ( 66.71%) 0.10 ( 13.71%) 0.02 ( 83.26%) 0.05 ( 57.16%)
> Elapsed max 1833.91 ( 0.00%) 3705.00 (-102.03%) 2193.26 (-19.59%) 3751.00 (-104.54%) 2504.54 (-36.57%)
> CPU min 99.00 ( 0.00%) 100.00 ( -1.01%) 99.00 ( 0.00%) 100.00 ( -1.01%) 100.00 ( -1.01%)
> CPU mean 99.00 ( 0.00%) 100.00 ( -1.01%) 99.00 ( 0.00%) 100.00 ( -1.01%) 100.00 ( -1.01%)
> CPU stddev 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%)
> CPU coeffvar 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%) 0.00 ( 0.00%)
> CPU max 99.00 ( 0.00%) 100.00 ( -1.01%) 99.00 ( 0.00%) 100.00 ( -1.01%) 100.00 ( -1.01%)
>
> 4.5.0 4.6.0 4.6.0 4.11.0-rc5 4.11.0-rc5
> vanilla vanillarevert-v4.6-v1r1 vanillaloadbased-v1r1
> User 9790.02 19914.22 11713.58 21021.12 13888.63
> System 1234.01 2465.45 1485.99 1635.85 1242.37
> Elapsed 11008.49 22247.35 13162.72 22528.79 15044.76
>
> As you can see, 4.6 is running twice as long as 4.5 (3703 seconds to
> comlete vs 1830 seconds). Reverting (revert-v4.6-v1r1) restores some of
> the performance and is 19.63% slower on average. 4.11-rc5 is as bad as
> 4.6 but applying your patch runs for 2503 seconds (36.74% slower). This
> is still pretty bad but it's a big step in the right direction.

OK

Because of the problems with the current default P-state selection algorithm,
to me the way to go is to migrate over to the load-based one going forward.
Actually, the patch I asked you to test is now scheduled for 4.12 even.

The load-based algorithm basically contains what's needed to react to load
changes quickly and avoid going down too fast, but its time granularity may not
be adequate for the workload at hand.

If possible, can you please add my current linux-next branch:

git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/rafael/linux-pm.git linux-next

to the comparison table? It basically is new ACPI and PM material scheduled
for the 4.12 merge window on top of 4.11.0-rc7. On top of that, it should be
easier to tweak the load-based P-state selection algorithm somewhat.

> > I guess that you have a pstate_snb directory under /sys/kernel/debug/
> > (if this is where debugfs is mounted)? It should not be there any
> > more with the new algo (as that does not use the PID controller any
> > more).
> >
>

[cut]

> > At this point I'm not sure what has changed in addition to the commit
> > you have found and while this is sort of interesting, I'm not sure how
> > relevant it is.
> >
> > Unfortunately, the P-state selection algorithm used so far on your
> > test system is quite fundamentally unstable and tends to converge to
> > either the highest or the lowest P-state in various conditions. If
> > the workload is sufficiently "light", it generally ends up in the
> > minimum P-state most of the time which probably happens here.
> >
> > I would really not like to try to "fix" that algorithm as this is
> > pretty much hopeless and most likely will lead to regressions
> > elsewhere. Instead, I'd prefer to migrate away from it altogether and
> > then tune things so that they work for everybody reasonably well
> > (which should be doable with the new algorithm). But let's see how
> > far we can get with that.
> >
>
> Other than altering min_perf_pct, is there a way of tuning intel_pstate
> such that it delays entering lower p-states for longer? It would
> increase power consumption but at least it would be an option for
> low-utilisation workloads and probably beneficial in general for those
> that need to reduce latency of wakups while still allowing at least the
> C1 state.

The P-state selection algorithm for core processors can be tweaked via
the debugfs interface under /sys/kernel/debug/pstate_snb/, for example
by changing the rate limit.

The load-based P-state selection algorithm has no tunables at this time,
but it should be easy enough to make the sampling interval of it adjustable
at least for debugging purposes.

Thanks,
Rafael

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-04-21 02:58    [W:0.129 / U:0.244 seconds]
©2003-2017 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site