lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Oct]   [3]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [RFC] yamldt v0.5, now a DTS compiler too
On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 9:13 AM, Pantelis Antoniou
<pantelis.antoniou@konsulko.com> wrote:
> Hi Rob,
>
> On Tue, 2017-10-03 at 08:18 -0500, Rob Herring wrote:
>> On Mon, Oct 2, 2017 at 2:46 PM, Pantelis Antoniou
>> <pantelis.antoniou@konsulko.com> wrote:
>> > Hi Rob,
>> >
>> > On Sun, 2017-10-01 at 17:00 -0500, Rob Herring wrote:
>> >> On Thu, Sep 28, 2017 at 2:58 PM, Pantelis Antoniou
>> >> <pantelis.antoniou@konsulko.com> wrote:
>> >> > Hello again,
>> >> >
>> >> > Significant progress has been made on yamldt and is now capable of
>> >> > not only generating yaml from DTS source but also compiling DTS sources
>> >> > and being almost fully compatible with DTC.
>> >>
>> >> Can you quantify "almost"?
>> >>
>> >> > Compiling the kernel's DTBs using yamldt is as simple as using a
>> >> > DTC=yamldt.
>> >>
>> >> Good.
>> >>
>> >> >
>> >> > Error reporting is accurate and validation against a YAML based schema
>> >> > works as well. In a short while I will begin posting patches with
>> >> > fixes on bindings and DTS files in the kernel.
>> >>
>> >> What I would like to see is the schema format posted for review.
>> >>
>> >
>> > I'm including the skeleton.yaml binding which is the template for
>> > the bindings and a board-example.yaml binding for a top level binding.
>> >
>> >> I would also like to see the bindings for top-level compatible strings
>> >> (aka boards) as an example. That's something that's simple enough that
>> >> I'd think we could agree on a format and start moving towards defining
>> >> board bindings that way.
>> >>
>> >
>> > Note there is some line wrapping I'm including a link
>> > to the github repo of the files:
>> >
>> >
>> > The skeleton.yaml
>> >
>> > https://raw.githubusercontent.com/pantoniou/yamldt/master/validate/bindings/skeleton.yaml
>> >
>> > %YAML 1.1
>> > ---
>> > # The name of the binding is first
>> > # The anchor is put there for use by others
>> > skeleton: &skeleton
>>
>> This and "id" seem redundant.
>>
>
> Indeed.

One other thing, "skeleton" is a bit weird as a key. It can't be
validated. All the other keys are standard words. I could write
"skeloton" by mistake and I guess I'd only find the mistake when
something inherits it. That's somewhat true with id, but we can at
least check "id" is present and that it's value is unique among all
other id values.

>
>> > version: 1
>> >
>> > id: skel-device
>> >
>> > title: >
>> > Skeleton Device
>> >
>> > maintainer:
>> > name: Skeleton Person <skel@kernel.org>
>> >
>> > description: >
>> > The Skeleton Device binding represents the SK11 device produced by
>> > the Skeleton Corporation. The binding can also support compatible
>> > clones made by second source vendors.
>> >
>> > # The class is an optional property that declares this
>> > # binding as part of a larger set
>> > # Multiple definitions are possible
>> > class: [ device, spi-device ]
>> >
>> > # This binding inherits property characteristics from the generic
>> > # spi-slave binding
>> > # Note that the notation is standard yaml reference
>> > inherits: *spi-slave
>> >
>> > # virtual bindings do not generate checkers
>> > virtual: true
>>
>> virtual is an overloaded term.
>>
>
> OK, what term should I use that this binding should not be instantiated
> as a checker, only be used by other bindings when inherited?

checks: true?

I'd really like to avoid having to decide and drop this, but I don't
really get why it is needed.

>
>> >
>> > # each property is defined by each name
>> > properties:
>> >
>> > # The compatible property is a reserved name. The type is always
>> > "string"
>> > # and should not be repeated device binding.
>> > compatible:
>> > category: required # required property
>> > type: strseq # is a sequence of strings
>> >
>> > description: >
>> > FX11 is a clone of the original SK11 device
>> >
>> > # v is always the name of the value of the property
>> > # np is passed to the checker and is the current
>> > # node pointer. We can access properties and call
>> > # methods that operate on them.
>> > # There can be multiple constraints, just put them
>> > # into a sequence.
>> > # Note that the BASE("skel,sk11") form from the previous
>> > # binding will have to be reworked.
>> > constraint: |
>> > anystreq(v, "skel,sk11") ||
>> > anystreq(v, "faux,fx11")
>>
>> Constraints and logic ops were certainly not decided in the last
>> attempt and I think will be the hardest part to define. I see you are
>> using eBPF in the checker. Is that where anystreq comes from?
>>
>
> Yes. The ebpf environment declares a number of methods that are executed
> outside the ebpf sandbox. Check out
>
> https://raw.githubusercontent.com/pantoniou/yamldt/master/validate/schema/codegen.yaml
> https://github.com/pantoniou/yamldt/blob/master/ebpf_dt.c

I looked at this some a while back. It wasn't clear to me what eBPF
gives us and what you have defined on top of it. What I'm really after
is documentation of the syntax and keywords here.

>> How would you express the ordering requirement (most significant
>> compatible first)?
>>
>
> Err, there might be new bpf API needed there. For the first stab at
> the bindings problem I concentrated on getting things working and be as
> clear as possible.
>
> You could do something like that:
>
> orderedstrseq(v, (const char *[]){ "skel,sk11", "faux,fx11", NULL })
>
> Which would check ordering too.
>
> Obviously you'd hide the weird syntax using a macro.
>
> #define ORDEREDSTRSEQ(_v, ...) \
> orderedstrseq(_v, (const char *[]){ __VA_ARGS__ , NULL })
>
>
> So you'd write the above as:
>
> ORDEREDSTRSEQ(v, "skel,sk11", "faux,fx11")
>
>> >
>> > # The reg property is a reserved name. The type is always "int" and
>> > # should not be repeated in a device binding. Constraints are
>> > defined
>> > # only in the context of the parent node's address, size, and ranges
>> > # cells. The description is inherited from the spi-slave binding.
>> > # Note that if inheriting from a base binding this declaration may
>> > # be omitted.
>> > reg:
>> > category: required # required property
>> > type: intseq # is a sequence of integers
>> >
>> > # spi-max-frequency needs the device-specific constraint to be
>> > supplied
>> > spi-max-frequency:
>> > # this constraint is dependent on the compatible property
>> > # property containing "skel,sk11"
>> > constraint: |
>> > v <= anystreq(get_strseq(np, "compatible"), "skel,sk11") ?
>> > 10000000 : 1000000
>> >
>> > # This property overrides the generic binding description with
>> > # a device specific description in order to mention the chip's
>> > # h/w cfg strapping pins.
>> > spi-cs-high:
>> > description: >
>> > Set if skeleton device configuration pins are set for chip
>> > select polarity high
>> >
>> > # Device specific properties don't inherit characteristic from a
>> > generic
>> > # binding so category, type, constraint, and description must be
>> > specified
>> > # if needed.
>> > skel,deprecated1:
>> > # note that the category may be declare more than one option
>> > category: [ deprecated, optional ]
>> > type: int
>> > constraint: |
>> > v >= 100000 && v <= 200000
>> > description: >
>> > First of two deprecated properties.
>> >
>> > # There are no constraints for properties of empty type
>> > skel,deprecated2:
>> > category: deprecated
>> > type: empty
>> > description: >
>> > Second of two deprecated properties.
>> >
>> > # This example could be auto-generated rather than explicitly
>> > included
>> > # in the yaml source.
>> > # Note that the YAML example must be validated against this binding
>> > # to be an accepted entry
>> > example:
>> >
>> > dts: |
>> > sk11@0 {
>> > compatible = "skel,sk11";
>> > reg = <0>;
>> > spi-max-frequency = <1000000>;
>> > spi-cs-high;
>> > };
>> >
>> > yaml: |
>> > sk11@0:
>> > compatible: "skel,sk11"
>> > reg: 0
>> > sip-max-frequency: 1000000
>> > spi-cs-high: true
>> > ---
>> > ...
>> >
>> > And board-example.yaml
>> >
>> > https://raw.githubusercontent.com/pantoniou/yamldt/master/validate/bindings/board-example.yaml
>> >
>> > %YAML 1.1
>> > ---
>> > board-example: &board-example
>> > version: 1
>> >
>> > title: A board example using compatible and model properties
>> >
>> > maintainer:
>> > name: Skeleton Person <skel@kernel.org>
>> >
>> > class: board
>> >
>> > # this binding is selected when the compatible property constraint
>> > matches
>> > selected: "compatible"
>>
>> We need some way to express this must be the root node. More
>> generally, we need to express what bindings must be a child of (think
>> sub-devices in MFDs). Perhaps that's just a "parent" key with the
>> value being the id/name.
>
>> >
>> > description: >
>> > A board binding example. Matches on a top-level compatible string
>> > and model.
>> >
>> > properties:
>> >
>> > compatible:
>> > category: required
>> > type: strseq
>> > description: |
>> > Compatible strings for the board example.
>> > The depth of the node must be zero, i.e. root.
>> >
>> > constraint: |
>> > get_depth(np) == 0 && (
>>
>> Ahh, I guess this is how you are doing it. I don't think this works
>> for any value other than 0. An MFD could be at any level.
>>
>
> Well, I could've used a streq(get_name(get_parent(np)), "/") test but
> this is faster. It's up to you what would work best.

Why not just a "parent" key?

>> > anystreq(v, "example,evm") ||
>> > anystreq(v, "example,evm2") ||
>> > anystreq(v, "example,base"))
>> >
>> > model:
>> > category: required
>> > type: str
>> > description: models that this board family supports
>> > constraint: |
>> > streq(v, "Example EVM") ||
>> > streq(v, "Example EVM2")
>> >
>> > example:
>> > dts: |
>> > / {
>> > compatible = "example,evm", "example,base";
>> > model = "Example EVM";
>> > };
>> > yaml: |
>> > compatible: [ "example,evm", "example,base" ] ;
>> > model: "Example EVM";
>>
>> I really don't want to see 2 examples. For now, it's going to be dts
>> format. It could be converted by script later if needed.
>>
>> Overall, I think this format is a bit long for boards. We have
>> something like ~1000 boards in arch/arm last I checked. I want adding
>> a board binding to be very short and easy to review. It's often only a
>> 1 line change. The main issue I have is it is just each SoC (or SoC
>> family) does things their own way.
>>
>
> Well, this is a full featured example; you could declare this a
> 'virtual' (or what ever you want to call it binding) and use:
>
> board-example-foo:
>
> inherits: *board-example
>
> properties:
> compatible: ...
>
> It is not absolutely terse, but it's still YAML. But for what is worth,
> those YAML files can be generated using the C preprocessor. You could
> define a macro that cuts the churn, albeit you lose the ability to
> parse them as normal YAML files.

C preprocessor doesn't sound like a great option to me.

Perhaps it is by SoC compatible and boards are just an addition to the
constraints. That's kind of how things are organized already.

Rob

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-10-03 19:14    [W:0.095 / U:4.808 seconds]
©2003-2017 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site