lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2011]   [Sep]   [1]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
SubjectRe: [patch] Revert "memcg: add memory.vmscan_stat"
From
On Tue, Aug 30, 2011 at 1:42 AM, Johannes Weiner <jweiner@redhat.com> wrote:
> On Tue, Aug 30, 2011 at 04:20:50PM +0900, KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki wrote:
>> On Tue, 30 Aug 2011 09:04:24 +0200
>> Johannes Weiner <jweiner@redhat.com> wrote:
>>
>> > On Tue, Aug 30, 2011 at 10:12:33AM +0900, KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki wrote:
>> > > @@ -1710,11 +1711,18 @@ static void mem_cgroup_record_scanstat(s
>> > >   spin_lock(&memcg->scanstat.lock);
>> > >   __mem_cgroup_record_scanstat(memcg->scanstat.stats[context], rec);
>> > >   spin_unlock(&memcg->scanstat.lock);
>> > > -
>> > > - memcg = rec->root;
>> > > - spin_lock(&memcg->scanstat.lock);
>> > > - __mem_cgroup_record_scanstat(memcg->scanstat.rootstats[context], rec);
>> > > - spin_unlock(&memcg->scanstat.lock);
>> > > + cgroup = memcg->css.cgroup;
>> > > + do {
>> > > +         spin_lock(&memcg->scanstat.lock);
>> > > +         __mem_cgroup_record_scanstat(
>> > > +                 memcg->scanstat.hierarchy_stats[context], rec);
>> > > +         spin_unlock(&memcg->scanstat.lock);
>> > > +         if (!cgroup->parent)
>> > > +                 break;
>> > > +         cgroup = cgroup->parent;
>> > > +         memcg = mem_cgroup_from_cont(cgroup);
>> > > + } while (memcg->use_hierarchy && memcg != rec->root);
>> >
>> > Okay, so this looks correct, but it sums up all parents after each
>> > memcg scanned, which could have a performance impact.  Usually,
>> > hierarchy statistics are only summed up when a user reads them.
>> >
>> Hmm. But sum-at-read doesn't work.
>>
>> Assume 3 cgroups in a hierarchy.
>>
>>       A
>>        /
>>       B
>>      /
>>     C
>>
>> C's scan contains 3 causes.
>>       C's scan caused by limit of A.
>>       C's scan caused by limit of B.
>>       C's scan caused by limit of C.
>>
>> If we make hierarchy sum at read, we think
>>       B's scan_stat = B's scan_stat + C's scan_stat
>> But in precice, this is
>>
>>       B's scan_stat = B's scan_stat caused by B +
>>                       B's scan_stat caused by A +
>>                       C's scan_stat caused by C +
>>                       C's scan_stat caused by B +
>>                       C's scan_stat caused by A.
>>
>> In orignal version.
>>       B's scan_stat = B's scan_stat caused by B +
>>                       C's scan_stat caused by B +
>>
>> After this patch,
>>       B's scan_stat = B's scan_stat caused by B +
>>                       B's scan_stat caused by A +
>>                       C's scan_stat caused by C +
>>                       C's scan_stat caused by B +
>>                       C's scan_stat caused by A.
>>
>> Hmm...removing hierarchy part completely seems fine to me.
>
> I see.
>
> You want to look at A and see whether its limit was responsible for
> reclaim scans in any children.  IMO, that is asking the question
> backwards.  Instead, there is a cgroup under reclaim and one wants to
> find out the cause for that.  Not the other way round.
>
> In my original proposal I suggested differentiating reclaim caused by
> internal pressure (due to own limit) and reclaim caused by
> external/hierarchical pressure (due to limits from parents).
>
> If you want to find out why C is under reclaim, look at its reclaim
> statistics.  If the _limit numbers are high, C's limit is the problem.
> If the _hierarchical numbers are high, the problem is B, A, or
> physical memory, so you check B for _limit and _hierarchical as well,
> then move on to A.
>
> Implementing this would be as easy as passing not only the memcg to
> scan (victim) to the reclaim code, but also the memcg /causing/ the
> reclaim (root_mem):
>
>        root_mem == victim -> account to victim as _limit
>        root_mem != victim -> account to victim as _hierarchical
>
> This would make things much simpler and more natural, both the code
> and the way of tracking down a problem, IMO.

This is pretty much the stats I am currently using for debugging the
reclaim patches. For example:

scanned_pages_by_system 0
scanned_pages_by_system_under_hierarchy 50989

scanned_pages_by_limit 0
scanned_pages_by_limit_under_hierarchy 0

"_system" is count under global reclaim, and "_limit" is count under
per-memcg reclaim.
"_under_hiearchy" is set if memcg is not the one triggering pressure.

So in the previous example:

> A (root)
> /
> B
> /
> C

For cgroup C:
scanned_pages_by_system:
scanned_pages_by_system_under_hierarchy: # of pages scanned under
global memory pressure

scanned_pages_by_limit: # of pages scanned while C hits the limit
scanned_pages_by_limit_under_hierarchy: # of pages scanned while B
hits the limit

--Ying

>
>> > I don't get why this has to be done completely different from the way
>> > we usually do things, without any justification, whatsoever.
>> >
>> > Why do you want to pass a recording structure down the reclaim stack?
>>
>> Just for reducing number of passed variables.
>
> It's still sitting on bottom of the reclaim stack the whole time.
>
> With my proposal, you would only need to pass the extra root_mem
> pointer.
>
--
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2011-09-01 08:07    [W:0.077 / U:0.076 seconds]
©2003-2014 Jasper Spaans. Advertise on this site