lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2010]   [Mar]   [1]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [GIT PULL] x86/cpu changes for v2.6.34


On Mon, 1 Mar 2010, Frederic Weisbecker wrote:

> On Mon, Mar 01, 2010 at 09:00:58AM +0100, Ingo Molnar wrote:
> >
> > if (smp_processor_id() == 7)
> > ftrace_enabled = 1;
> >
> > ... bootup sequence ...
> >
> > if (smp_processor_id() == 7)
> > ftrace_enabled = 0;

> So, after the boot you can look at /debug/tracing/per_cpu/cpu7/trace
> and the end of the trace should contain what you want.

Both of you seemed to miss the fact that it's not cpu7 that is
particularly slow. See the original email from me in this thread: the jump
was at some random point:

[ 0.245179] CPU 1 MCA banks CMCI:2 CMCI:3 CMCI:5 SHD:6 SHD:8
[ 0.265332] #2
[ 0.353185] CPU 2 MCA banks CMCI:2 CMCI:3 CMCI:5 SHD:6 SHD:8
[ 0.373328] #3
[ 2.193277] CPU 3 MCA banks CMCI:2 CMCI:3 CMCI:5 SHD:6 SHD:8
[ 2.213379] #4

and the reason I grepped for "CPU 7" was that it's the _last_ CPU on this
machine, so what I was grepping for was basically "how long did it take to
bring up all CPU's".

So that particular really bad case apparently happened for CPU#3, but the
two other slow cases happened for CPU#4.

Also, it seems to happen only about every fifth boot or so. Suggestions
for something simple that can trace things like that?

Linus


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2010-03-01 17:51    [from the cache]
©2003-2014 Jasper Spaans. Advertise on this site