lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2009]   [Jun]   [4]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: When does Linux drop UDP packets?
On Thu, 4 Jun 2009, Eric Dumazet wrote:

> david@lang.hm a ?crit :
>> On Thu, 4 Jun 2009, Steven Rostedt wrote:
>>
>>> On Thu, Jun 04, 2009 at 04:53:47PM +0200, Philipp Reh wrote:
>>>> Dear list,
>>>>
>>>> I have the following setting in which a client that resides on the same
>>>> physical network as a server wants to receive any UDP packet that
>>>> arrives on any of its interfaces sent by that server.
>>>>
>>>> The code sets the broadcast flag, calls bind to INADDR_ANY and
>>>> uses recvfrom from there on.
>>>>
>>>> Let's say the server resides in the subnet 192.168.6.255 and the
>>>> client in 192.168.3.255. The server uses its real IP as the packet's
>>>> sender ip (192.168.6.5).
>>>
>>> You don't say what the client IP is. Let's assume that it is 192.168.3.1
>>> for simplicity.
>>>
>>>>
>>>> Now the first problem I've encountered is the following:
>>>> If the client removes its default route and doesn't have any route
>>>> pointing into the subnet the server is in, the packets get discarded
>>>> (still tcpdump sees them).
>>>>
>>>
>>> Are you saying that the server sent to 192.168.3.1 with source ip of
>>> 192.168.6.5 and the client did not see it?
>>>
>>>> The second problem is that if the server uses the broadcast address as
>>>> its sender address (255.255.255.255), the packets get always discarded
>>>> (again, tcpdump sees them).
>>>
>>> Again, what was the destination IP address?
>>>
>>>> Now if the server fakes its sender address to be in the client's subnet,
>>>> every packet arrives again.
>>>
>>> So the only thing you change is the sender address?
>>>
>>> What tools are you using to read the packets, and how do you know it is
>>> dropped?
>>
>>
>> I have seen the same thing. I have syslog servers on one subnet without
>> a default route. If I configure a server on another subnet to send it
>> logs I can see the packets with tcpdump, but syslogd will not record them.
>>
>> If I configure a route on the recieving box that makes it think that it
>> can get to the sender (note that the route can be completely bogus,
>> pointing at a wrong or non-existing gateway) the kernel is happy and the
>> packets show up to syslogd
>>
>> the systems I am running do _not_ have selinux on them.
>>
>> I have seen this as far back as 2.6.12 so it's not a recent change.
>>
>> if you need examples with IP addresses
>>
>> box 1
>> IP 10.1.1.2
>>
>> router
>> IP 10.1.1.1
>> IP 192.168.1.1
>>
>> box 2
>> IP 192.168.1.2
>>
>> If I configure box 2 to have a route to box1, but do not configure box 1
>> to have any route (including not having a default route) that would get
>> it to a 192.168.1.x subnet tcpdump on box 1 will show the syslog
>> packets, but syslog (and any non-pcap tool) will not see the packets)
>>
>> if I configure a route on box 1 to have a default route of 10.1.1.3
>> (which does not exist, so cannot possibly route packets anywhere) then
>> everything works.
>
> I guess you need to change rp_filter settings
>
> Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt
>
> rp_filter - INTEGER
>
> 0 - No source validation.
> 1 - Strict mode as defined in RFC3704 Strict Reverse Path
> Each incoming packet is tested against the FIB and if the interface
> is not the best reverse path the packet check will fail.
> By default failed packets are discarded.
> 2 - Loose mode as defined in RFC3704 Loose Reverse Path
> Each incoming packet's source address is also tested against the FIB
> and if the source address is not reachable via any interface
> the packet check will fail.
>
> Current recommended practice in RFC3704 is to enable strict mode
> to prevent IP spoofing from DDos attacks. If using asymmetric routing
> or other complicated routing, then loose mode is recommended.
>
> conf/all/rp_filter must also be set to non-zero to do source validation
> on the interface
>
> Default value is 0. Note that some distributions enable it
> in startup scripts.

thanks, On my Debian based systems I have commented this out of the
sysctl.conf file, but apparently there is some other script that is
setting it anyway. I'll have to track down what it's doing.

David Lang

>
>>
>>>> So my real question is:
>>>> When does Linux discard packets and how can I prevent it from doing
>>>> that?
>>
>> for this problem, set a default route that points at a non-existing
>> gateway and I believe that your problem will go away.
>
>
>


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2009-06-04 20:53    [from the cache]
©2003-2014 Jasper Spaans. Advertise on this site