lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2009]   [Nov]   [5]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: Performance regression in IO scheduler still there
Date
Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> writes:

> Hi,
>
> I took time and remeasured tiobench results on recent kernel. A short
> conclusion is that there is still a performance regression which I reported
> few months ago. The machine is Intel 2 CPU with 2 GB RAM and plain SATA
> drive. tiobench sequential write performance numbers with 16 threads:
> 2.6.29: AVG STDERR
> 37.80 38.54 39.48 -> 38.606667 0.687475
>
> 2.6.32-rc5:
> 37.36 36.41 36.61 -> 36.793333 0.408928
>
> So about 5% regression. The regression happened sometime between 2.6.29 and
> 2.6.30 and stays the same since then... With deadline scheduler, there's
> no regression. Shouldn't we do something about it?

Sorry it took so long, but I've been flat out lately. I ran some
numbers against 2.6.29 and 2.6.32-rc5, both with low_latency set to 0
and to 1. Here are the results (average of two runs):

rlat | rrlat | wlat | rwlat
kernel | Thr | read | randr | write | randw | avg, max | avg, max | avg, max | avg,max
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.6.29 | 8 | 72.95 | 20.06 | 269.66 | 231.59 | 6.625, 1683.66 | 23.241, 1547.97 | 1.761, 698.10 | 0.720, 443.64
| 16 | 72.33 | 20.03 | 278.85 | 228.81 | 13.643, 2499.77 | 46.575, 1717.10 | 3.304, 1149.29 | 1.011, 140.30
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.6.32-rc5 | 8 | 86.58 | 19.80 | 198.82 | 205.06 | 5.694, 977.26 | 22.559, 870.16 | 2.359, 693.88 | 0.530, 24.32
| 16 | 86.82 | 21.10 | 199.00 | 212.02 | 11.010, 1958.78 | 40.195, 1662.35 | 4.679, 1351.27 | 1.007, 25.36
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.6.32-rc5 | 8 | 87.65 | 117.65 | 298.27 | 212.35 | 5.615, 984.89 | 4.060, 97.39 | 1.535, 311.14 | 0.534, 24.29
low_lat=0 | 16 | 95.60 | 119.95*| 302.48 | 213.27 | 10.263, 1750.19 | 13.899, 1006.21 | 3.221, 734.22 | 1.062, 40.40
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Legend:
rlat - read latency
rrlat - random read latency
wlat - write lancy
rwlat - random write latency
* - the two runs reported vastly different numbers: 67.53 and 172.46

So, as you can see, if we turn off the low_latency tunable, we get
better numbers across the board with the exception of random writes.
It's also interesting to note that the latencies reported by tiobench
are more favorable with low_latency set to 0, which is
counter-intuitive.

So, now it seems we don't have a regression in sequential read
bandwidth, but we do have a regression in random read bandwidth (though
the random write latencies look better). So, I'll look into that, as it
is almost 10%, which is significant.

Cheers,
Jeff


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2009-11-05 21:13    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans