lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2009]   [Nov]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: Performance regression in IO scheduler still there
On Thu 05-11-09 15:10:52, Jeff Moyer wrote:
> Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> writes:
>
> > Hi,
> >
> > I took time and remeasured tiobench results on recent kernel. A short
> > conclusion is that there is still a performance regression which I reported
> > few months ago. The machine is Intel 2 CPU with 2 GB RAM and plain SATA
> > drive. tiobench sequential write performance numbers with 16 threads:
> > 2.6.29: AVG STDERR
> > 37.80 38.54 39.48 -> 38.606667 0.687475
> >
> > 2.6.32-rc5:
> > 37.36 36.41 36.61 -> 36.793333 0.408928
> >
> > So about 5% regression. The regression happened sometime between 2.6.29 and
> > 2.6.30 and stays the same since then... With deadline scheduler, there's
> > no regression. Shouldn't we do something about it?
>
> Sorry it took so long, but I've been flat out lately. I ran some
> numbers against 2.6.29 and 2.6.32-rc5, both with low_latency set to 0
> and to 1. Here are the results (average of two runs):
>
> rlat | rrlat | wlat | rwlat
> kernel | Thr | read | randr | write | randw | avg, max | avg, max | avg, max | avg,max
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 2.6.29 | 8 | 72.95 | 20.06 | 269.66 | 231.59 | 6.625, 1683.66 | 23.241, 1547.97 | 1.761, 698.10 | 0.720, 443.64
> | 16 | 72.33 | 20.03 | 278.85 | 228.81 | 13.643, 2499.77 | 46.575, 1717.10 | 3.304, 1149.29 | 1.011, 140.30
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 2.6.32-rc5 | 8 | 86.58 | 19.80 | 198.82 | 205.06 | 5.694, 977.26 | 22.559, 870.16 | 2.359, 693.88 | 0.530, 24.32
> | 16 | 86.82 | 21.10 | 199.00 | 212.02 | 11.010, 1958.78 | 40.195, 1662.35 | 4.679, 1351.27 | 1.007, 25.36
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 2.6.32-rc5 | 8 | 87.65 | 117.65 | 298.27 | 212.35 | 5.615, 984.89 | 4.060, 97.39 | 1.535, 311.14 | 0.534, 24.29
> low_lat=0 | 16 | 95.60 | 119.95*| 302.48 | 213.27 | 10.263, 1750.19 | 13.899, 1006.21 | 3.221, 734.22 | 1.062, 40.40
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Legend:
> rlat - read latency
> rrlat - random read latency
> wlat - write lancy
> rwlat - random write latency
> * - the two runs reported vastly different numbers: 67.53 and 172.46
>
> So, as you can see, if we turn off the low_latency tunable, we get
> better numbers across the board with the exception of random writes.
> It's also interesting to note that the latencies reported by tiobench
> are more favorable with low_latency set to 0, which is
> counter-intuitive.
>
> So, now it seems we don't have a regression in sequential read
> bandwidth, but we do have a regression in random read bandwidth (though
> the random write latencies look better). So, I'll look into that, as it
> is almost 10%, which is significant.
Sadly, I don't see the improvement you can see :(. The numbers are the
same regardless low_latency set to 0:
2.6.32-rc5 low_latency = 0:
37.39 36.43 36.51 -> 36.776667 0.434920
But my testing environment is a plain SATA drive so that probably
explains the difference...

Honza
--
Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
SUSE Labs, CR


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2009-11-11 15:13    [W:0.093 / U:0.080 seconds]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans. Advertise on this site