lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2009]   [Oct]   [30]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
Date
From
Subject[tip:tracing/core] tracing: Amend documentation in recordmcount.pl to reflect implementation
Commit-ID:  d49f6aa76d24c60a52530474cb662e8ad9f09471
Gitweb: http://git.kernel.org/tip/d49f6aa76d24c60a52530474cb662e8ad9f09471
Author: Li Hong <lihong.hi@gmail.com>
AuthorDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2009 13:01:38 +0800
Committer: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
CommitDate: Thu, 29 Oct 2009 15:11:40 -0400

tracing: Amend documentation in recordmcount.pl to reflect implementation

The documentation currently says we will use the first function in a section
as a reference. The actual algorithm is: choose the first global function we
meet as a reference. If there is none, choose the first local one.
Change the documentation to be consistent with the code.

Also add several other clarifications.

Signed-off-by: Li Hong <lihong.hi@gmail.com>
LKML-Reference: <20091028050138.GA30758@uhli>
Signed-off-by: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
---
scripts/recordmcount.pl | 84 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------
1 files changed, 49 insertions(+), 35 deletions(-)
diff --git a/scripts/recordmcount.pl b/scripts/recordmcount.pl
index bfb8b2c..a569be7 100755
--- a/scripts/recordmcount.pl
+++ b/scripts/recordmcount.pl
@@ -6,73 +6,89 @@
# all the offsets to the calls to mcount.
#
#
-# What we want to end up with is a section in vmlinux called
-# __mcount_loc that contains a list of pointers to all the
-# call sites in the kernel that call mcount. Later on boot up, the kernel
-# will read this list, save the locations and turn them into nops.
-# When tracing or profiling is later enabled, these locations will then
-# be converted back to pointers to some function.
+# What we want to end up with this is that each object file will have a
+# section called __mcount_loc that will hold the list of pointers to mcount
+# callers. After final linking, the vmlinux will have within .init.data the
+# list of all callers to mcount between __start_mcount_loc and __stop_mcount_loc.
+# Later on boot up, the kernel will read this list, save the locations and turn
+# them into nops. When tracing or profiling is later enabled, these locations
+# will then be converted back to pointers to some function.
#
# This is no easy feat. This script is called just after the original
# object is compiled and before it is linked.
#
-# The references to the call sites are offsets from the section of text
-# that the call site is in. Hence, all functions in a section that
-# has a call site to mcount, will have the offset from the beginning of
-# the section and not the beginning of the function.
+# When parse this object file using 'objdump', the references to the call
+# sites are offsets from the section that the call site is in. Hence, all
+# functions in a section that has a call site to mcount, will have the
+# offset from the beginning of the section and not the beginning of the
+# function.
+#
+# But where this section will reside finally in vmlinx is undetermined at
+# this point. So we can't use this kind of offsets to record the final
+# address of this call site.
+#
+# The trick is to change the call offset referring the start of a section to
+# referring a function symbol in this section. During the link step, 'ld' will
+# compute the final address according to the information we record.
#
-# The trick is to find a way to record the beginning of the section.
-# The way we do this is to look at the first function in the section
-# which will also be the location of that section after final link.
# e.g.
#
# .section ".sched.text", "ax"
-# .globl my_func
-# my_func:
# [...]
-# call mcount (offset: 0x5)
+# func1:
+# [...]
+# call mcount (offset: 0x10)
+# [...]
+# ret
+# .globl fun2
+# func2: (offset: 0x20)
+# [...]
# [...]
# ret
-# other_func:
+# func3:
# [...]
-# call mcount (offset: 0x1b)
+# call mcount (offset: 0x30)
# [...]
#
# Both relocation offsets for the mcounts in the above example will be
-# offset from .sched.text. If we make another file called tmp.s with:
+# offset from .sched.text. If we choose global symbol func2 as a reference and
+# make another file called tmp.s with the new offsets:
#
# .section __mcount_loc
-# .quad my_func + 0x5
-# .quad my_func + 0x1b
+# .quad func2 - 0x10
+# .quad func2 + 0x10
#
-# We can then compile this tmp.s into tmp.o, and link it to the original
+# We can then compile this tmp.s into tmp.o, and link it back to the original
# object.
#
-# But this gets hard if my_func is not globl (a static function).
-# In such a case we have:
+# In our algorithm, we will choose the first global function we meet in this
+# section as the reference. But this gets hard if there is no global functions
+# in this section. In such a case we have to select a local one. E.g. func1:
#
# .section ".sched.text", "ax"
-# my_func:
+# func1:
# [...]
-# call mcount (offset: 0x5)
+# call mcount (offset: 0x10)
# [...]
# ret
-# other_func:
+# func2:
# [...]
-# call mcount (offset: 0x1b)
+# call mcount (offset: 0x20)
# [...]
+# .section "other.section"
#
# If we make the tmp.s the same as above, when we link together with
-# the original object, we will end up with two symbols for my_func:
+# the original object, we will end up with two symbols for func1:
# one local, one global. After final compile, we will end up with
-# an undefined reference to my_func.
+# an undefined reference to func1 or a wrong reference to another global
+# func1 in other files.
#
# Since local objects can reference local variables, we need to find
# a way to make tmp.o reference the local objects of the original object
-# file after it is linked together. To do this, we convert the my_func
+# file after it is linked together. To do this, we convert func1
# into a global symbol before linking tmp.o. Then after we link tmp.o
-# we will only have a single symbol for my_func that is global.
-# We can convert my_func back into a local symbol and we are done.
+# we will only have a single symbol for func1 that is global.
+# We can convert func1 back into a local symbol and we are done.
#
# Here are the steps we take:
#
@@ -86,10 +102,8 @@
# 6) Link together this new object with the list object.
# 7) Convert the local functions back to local symbols and rename
# the result as the original object.
-# End.
# 8) Link the object with the list object.
# 9) Move the result back to the original object.
-# End.
#

use strict;

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2009-10-30 17:21    [from the cache]
©2003-2014 Jasper Spaans. Advertise on this site