lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2008]   [May]   [22]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: Number of bugs - statistics
On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 9:50 AM, Adrian Bunk <bunk@kernel.org> wrote:
> On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 09:20:46AM -0700, Natalie Protasevich wrote:
>> On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 8:54 AM, Adrian Bunk <bunk@kernel.org> wrote:
>> > On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 07:51:35AM -0700, Arjan van de Ven wrote:
>> >> On Thu, 22 May 2008 17:41:14 +0300
>> >> Adrian Bunk <bunk@kernel.org> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> > On Thu, May 22, 2008 at 02:28:17PM +0200, Bosko Radivojevic wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > > Hi!
>> >> >
>> >> > Hi Bosko!
>> >> >
>> >> > > Is there any kind of analysis of number of (reported or resolved)
>> >> > > bugs through time in Linux kernel floating around? I'm trying to
>> >> > > convince my colleagues that newer kernel version does not mean more
>> >> > > bugs than the previous 'well tested' ones.
>> >> >
>> >> > We definitely have many regressions (something that previously worked
>> >> > does no longer work) in each kernel.
>> >>
>> >> ... and many of those regressions are things people are unlikely to
>> >> hit. And we fix many long standing bugs as well.
>> >>
>> >> Maybe some other data:
>> >> * The incoming rate of ACPI bugs has been pretty much flat the last 3
>> >> years, while the number of Linux (and ACPI) users has grown
>> >> significantly. The number of unfixed bugs has more than halved, from
>> >> over 200 to well below 100.
>> >> * The SCSI maintainer also reports that he sees flat to declining bug
>> >> rates; again with the increase in Linux user base that is a good sign
>> >
>> > Andrew sees and handles the majority of incoming bug reports.
>> > Ask him whether he agress with this.
>> >
>> > And ALSA alone has 2000 open bug reports, which makes the open ACPI or
>> > SCSI bug numbers relatively irrelevant in any "number of bugs"
>> > statistics.
>> >
>> >> > > Any kind of (research) reports or papers that address this issue is
>> >> > > more than welcome.
>> >> >
>> >> > Any such reports or papers would anyway be flawed since we have no
>> >> > data one could use for doing serious statistics.
>> >>
>> >> We have data for 2.6.25 at least, on which we can and do serious
>> >> statistics.
>> >>...
>> >
>> > Where do we have data for 2.6.25 covering all kinds of bugs?
>> >
>> > Regressions reported before 2.6.25 and Oops'es etc. are only a small
>> > part of the picture.
>>
>> There is no unified tracking mechanism as of now, this is a big
>> problem. There are some projects that have ideas about universal bug
>> tracking, for example some people from KDE team expressed their ideas,
>> I'm planning to get back with them.
>> It would be great if all reports from known and unknown bugzillas were
>> piped into one place and sorted out,
>
> Not everyone uses Bugzilla (e.g. ALSA uses Mantis).
>
> And the majority of bug reports might still go only to mailing lists and
> not into any bugtracker at all. As long as this happens the data is
> simply not available.

True. It was argued that mailing list is more effective that bugzilla
as a collaboration mechanism while working on a bug. But if it was a
way to record it into bugzilla "seemlessly" (as Andrew tried to
enforce, by asking those on the list to add CC to bugme-deamon) this
would be perfect.
Another one to implement...
>

>> by various criteria: ALSA bugs
>> are numerous, which is not important for most enterprise server users
>> who would completely disregard this category, whereas desktop users
>> will probably concentrate on those more than any other.
>
> The majority of machines running Linux most likely runs with ARM CPUs.
>
> Show me any public source you want to use for getting serious data for
> this area.

There is no one, except dispersed reports and ... appropriate
implementation involving search engine comes to mind.
>
>> So the answer
>> to question about kernel stability would be more adequate depending on
>> who's asking.
>
> You must not confuse "number of reported bugs" with "kernel stability" -
> these two can be quite decoupled.

Number of existing, proven and prioritized bugs maybe better to say.
I think there is a correlation.
--Natalie
>
>> --Natalie
>
> cu
> Adrian
>
> --
>
> "Is there not promise of rain?" Ling Tan asked suddenly out
> of the darkness. There had been need of rain for many days.
> "Only a promise," Lao Er said.
> Pearl S. Buck - Dragon Seed
>
>


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2008-05-22 19:11    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans