lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2008]   [Apr]   [13]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
    Patch in this message
    /
    From
    Subject[PATCH 1/1] Fix typos in Documentation/filesystems/seq_file.txt
    Date
    A couple of typos crept into the newly added document
    about the seq_file interface. This patch corrects those
    typos and simultaneously deletes a few superfluous blanks.

    Signed-off-by: Dmitri Vorobiev <dmitri.vorobiev@gmail.com>
    ---
    Documentation/filesystems/seq_file.txt | 18 +++++++++---------
    1 files changed, 9 insertions(+), 9 deletions(-)

    diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/seq_file.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/seq_file.txt
    index cc6cdb9..2b6aba6 100644
    --- a/Documentation/filesystems/seq_file.txt
    +++ b/Documentation/filesystems/seq_file.txt
    @@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ The seq_file interface


    There are numerous ways for a device driver (or other kernel component) to
    -provide information to the user or system administrator. One useful
    +provide information to the user or system administrator. One useful
    technique is the creation of virtual files, in debugfs, /proc or elsewhere.
    Virtual files can provide human-readable output that is easy to get at
    without any special utility programs; they can also make life easier for
    @@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ grown over the years.
    Creating those files correctly has always been a bit of a challenge,
    however. It is not that hard to make a virtual file which returns a
    string. But life gets trickier if the output is long - anything greater
    -than an application is likely to read in a single operation. Handling
    +than an application is likely to read in a single operation. Handling
    multiple reads (and seeks) requires careful attention to the reader's
    position within the virtual file - that position is, likely as not, in the
    middle of a line of output. The kernel has traditionally had a number of
    @@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ following:

    Then concatenate the output files out1 and out2 and get the right
    result. Yes, it is a thoroughly useless module, but the point is to show
    -how the mechanism works without getting lost in other details. (Those
    +how the mechanism works without getting lost in other details. (Those
    wanting to see the full source for this module can find it at
    http://lwn.net/Articles/22359/).

    @@ -92,14 +92,14 @@ implementations; in most cases the start() function should check for a
    "past end of file" condition and return NULL if need be.

    For more complicated applications, the private field of the seq_file
    -structure can be used. There is also a special value whch can be returned
    +structure can be used. There is also a special value which can be returned
    by the start() function called SEQ_START_TOKEN; it can be used if you wish
    to instruct your show() function (described below) to print a header at the
    top of the output. SEQ_START_TOKEN should only be used if the offset is
    zero, however.

    The next function to implement is called, amazingly, next(); its job is to
    -move the iterator forward to the next position in the sequence. The
    +move the iterator forward to the next position in the sequence. The
    example module can simply increment the position by one; more useful
    modules will do what is needed to step through some data structure. The
    next() function returns a new iterator, or NULL if the sequence is
    @@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ the four functions we have just defined:
    This structure will be needed to tie our iterator to the /proc file in
    a little bit.

    -It's worth noting that the interator value returned by start() and
    +It's worth noting that the iterator value returned by start() and
    manipulated by the other functions is considered to be completely opaque by
    the seq_file code. It can thus be anything that is useful in stepping
    through the data to be output. Counters can be useful, but it could also be
    @@ -261,13 +261,13 @@ routines useful:
    loff_t *ppos);

    These helpers will interpret pos as a position within the list and iterate
    -accordingly. Your start() and next() functions need only invoke the
    -seq_list_* helpers with a pointer to the appropriate list_head structure.
    +accordingly. Your start() and next() functions need only invoke the
    +seq_list_* helpers with a pointer to the appropriate list_head structure.


    The extra-simple version

    -For extremely simple virtual files, there is an even easier interface. A
    +For extremely simple virtual files, there is an even easier interface. A
    module can define only the show() function, which should create all the
    output that the virtual file will contain. The file's open() method then
    calls:
    --
    1.5.3


    \
     
     \ /
      Last update: 2008-04-13 20:29    [W:0.027 / U:59.488 seconds]
    ©2003-2016 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site