lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2005]   [Aug]   [17]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
    /
    From
    SubjectRe: Schedulers benchmark - Was: [ANNOUNCE][RFC] PlugSched-5.2.4 for 2.6.12 and 2.6.13-rc6
    Date
    On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 09:15 am, Peter Williams wrote:
    > Con Kolivas wrote:
    > > On Wed, 17 Aug 2005 18:10, Peter Williams wrote:
    > >>Michal Piotrowski wrote:
    > >>>Hi,
    > >>>here are schedulers benchmark (part2):
    > >>>[bits deleted]
    > >>
    > >>Here's a summary of your output generated using the attached Python
    > >> script.
    > >>
    > >> | Build Statistics | Overall Statistics
    > >>
    > >>-----------------------------------------------------------------------
    > >> Scheduler| Real CPU SYS TPT | CPU TPT delay CXSW
    > >>
    > >> | (secs) (secs) (%) (%) | (secs) (%) (secs)
    > >>
    > >>-----------------------------------------------------------------------
    > >> ingosched| 3128.5 5056.3 8.18 161.6 | 5379.5 171.9 159367.4 1556452
    > >> staircase| 3131.2 5032.6 8.09 160.7 | 5352.9 170.9 135193.0 1670366
    > >>spa_no_frills| 3103.8 5049.5 7.98 162.7 | 5266.7 169.7 172384.8 520937
    > >> zaphod(d,d)| 3561.7 4823.8 9.25 135.4 | 5132.0 144.1 148361.5 1771617
    > >> zaphod(d,0)| 3551.2 4809.9 9.19 135.4 | 5114.7 144.0 144022.0 1784814
    > >> zaphod(0,d)| 3126.8 5063.2 8.11 161.9 | 5278.1 168.8 173438.4 573587
    > >> zaphod(0,0)| 3105.5 5052.9 7.98 162.7 | 5254.8 169.2 165774.4 577534
    > >> nicksched| 3294.7 5095.1 9.10 154.6 | 5425.4 164.6 104298.2 2205665
    > >>
    > >>where the (x,y) after zaphod means (max_ia_bonus, max_tpt_bonus) and "d"
    > >>means default. I had to kill a few significant digits to squeeze it
    > >>into 71 columns. Overall statistics are extracted from the schedstats
    > >>data. In the "Build Statistics" "CPU" is the sum of the user and sys
    > >>times and "SYS" is the percentage of that which was sys time (as I feel
    > >>that is a better thing to compare than raw sys times).
    > >>
    > >>I was intrigued by the fact that zaphod(d,d) and zaphod(d,0) take longer
    > >>in real time but use less cpu. I was assuming that this meant that some
    > >>other job was getting some cpu but the schedstats data doesn't support
    > >>that. Also it wouldn't make sense anyway as you'd expect jobs doing the
    > >>same amount of work to use roughly the same amount of cpu. My latest
    > >>theory is that your machine has hyper threads and this artifact is
    > >>caused by the mechanism in the scheduler for handling tasks with
    > >>differing priority in sibling hyper thread channels. Does your system
    > >>have hyper threads?
    > >
    > > That would only do something if there was a difference in 'nice' levels.
    >
    > Not in zaphod and spa_no_frills. They user dynamic priority. I may
    > rethink this as the argument for using dynamic priority mainly applies
    > to the entitlement based mode of zaphod.

    Static - like mainline and staircase - would be a good idea as the whole point
    of hyperthread-aware 'nice' levels is they obey 'nice', not dynamic priority.

    >
    > > What
    > > you're seeing is the fact that balancing is intimately tied in with
    > > timeslice size and you have increased idle time.
    >
    > I partially agree in that reducing the time slice size would reduce the
    > size of the effect but it's not the cause of the effect. The hyper
    > threading code is the cause.
    >
    > BTW I'm wondering why the TPT column (i.e. cpu time / real elapsed
    > time) is so low for all schedulers. It's been a long time since I ran
    > your "contest" benchmarks for any of these schedulers but I seem to
    > recall that they all did a lot better than this when I extracted the
    > equivalent data from the output. Generally, I think that they all used
    > greater than 95% of the available cpu time which would be the equivalent
    > of TPT values of 190% or more in this case.

    He did a make allyesconfig which is a bit different and probably far too i/o
    bound. By the way a single kernel compile is hardly a reproducible benchmark.
    Ideally he should be using my 'kernbench' benchmark (hint hint).

    > Another interesting thing to be noted in these numbers is that the cost
    > of the extra context switches caused by the "improved interactive
    > performance" measures doesn't seem to be very significant.

    I doubt this workload is running into that, the i/o bound nature of a kernel
    compile means it is not really a pure cpu usage scalability measure, it's
    just easy to do. Check the lkml archives for some comments by WLIrwin on the
    limitations of using kernbench as a scalability measure.

    Cheers,
    Con
    -
    To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
    the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
    More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
    Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

    \
     
     \ /
      Last update: 2005-08-18 01:28    [W:0.031 / U:30.136 seconds]
    ©2003-2016 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site