lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2005]   [Jan]   [2]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: starting with 2.7
For me, as someone who very rarely actually changes any code in
the kernel, I have always found the stable series useful for
two reasons:

1) It encourages me to test the kernel; if I have a kernel
that is generally thought to be stable then I will try it on
my home machine and report problems - this lets the kernel
get tested on a wide range of hardware and situations; if there
is no kernel that is liable to be stable changes will get much
less testing on a smaller range of hardware.

2) If I have a bug in a vendor kernel everyone just tells
me to go and speak to the vendor - so at least having a stable
base to go back to can let me report a bug that isn't due
to any vendors patches.

3) In some cases the commercial vendors don't seem to release
source to some of the kernels except to people who have bought
the packages, so those vendor kernel fixes aren't 'publically'
visible.

I think (1) is very important - getting large numbers of people
to test OSS is its greatest asset.

Dave
-----Open up your eyes, open up your mind, open up your code -------
/ Dr. David Alan Gilbert | Running GNU/Linux on Alpha,68K| Happy \
\ gro.gilbert @ treblig.org | MIPS,x86,ARM,SPARC,PPC & HPPA | In Hex /
\ _________________________|_____ http://www.treblig.org |_______/
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 14:09    [from the cache]
©2003-2014 Jasper Spaans. Advertise on this site