lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2004]   [Aug]   [16]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: boot time, process start time, and NOW time
From
Date
On Mon, 2004-08-16 at 21:26, George Anzinger wrote:
> Albert Cahalan wrote:
> > On Mon, 2004-08-16 at 20:31, George Anzinger wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Hm... That patch was for a reason... It seems to me that doing anything short
> >>of putting "xtime" (or better, clock_gettime() :)) in at fork time is not going
> >>to fix anything. As written the start_time in the task_struct is fixed. If
> >>"now - uptime + time_from_boot_to_process_start" it is wandering, it must be the
> >>fault of "now - uptime". Since this seems to be wandering, and we corrected
> >>uptime in the referenced patch, is it safe to assume that "now" is actually
> >>being computed from "jiffies" rather than a gettimeofday()?
> >>
> >>Seems like that is where we should be changing things.
> >
> >
> > That's userspace, which works fine on a 2.4.xx kernel.
> > If userspace were to change, it wouldn't work OK for
> > a 2.4.xx kernel anymore. So consider that cast in stone.
> >
> > "now" is the time() function. Using gettimeofday()
> > would only make sense if I decided to pay the cost
> > of asking for the time every time I look at a task.
> >
> > Here is the "now - uptime + time_from_boot_to_process_start"
> > calculation, unsimplified, ripped from the procps code:
> >
> > ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
> > unsigned long seconds_since_boot = -1;
> > static unsigned long seconds_since_1970;
> > static unsigned long time_of_boot;
> >
> > some_init_function(){
> > seconds_since_boot = uptime(0,0);
> > seconds_since_1970 = time(NULL);
> > time_of_boot = seconds_since_1970 - seconds_since_boot;
> > }
> >
> > static int pr_stime(char *restrict const outbuf, const proc_t *restrict const pp){
> > struct tm *proc_time;
> > struct tm *our_time;
> > time_t t;
> > const char *fmt;
> > int tm_year;
> > int tm_yday;
> > our_time = localtime(&seconds_since_1970); /* not reentrant */
> > tm_year = our_time->tm_year;
> > tm_yday = our_time->tm_yday;
> > t = time_of_boot + pp->start_time / Hertz;
> > proc_time = localtime(&t); /* not reentrant, this corrupts our_time */
> > fmt = "%H:%M"; /* 03:02 23:59 */
> > if(tm_yday != proc_time->tm_yday) fmt = "%b%d"; /* Jun06 Aug27 */
> > if(tm_year != proc_time->tm_year) fmt = "%Y"; /* 1991 2001 */
> > return strftime(outbuf, 42, fmt, proc_time);
> > }
> > ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
> >
> >
> Hm, I assume time() just returns the seconds part of gettimeofday(). Is
> uptime() local to procps? What does it do? You implied it uses the kernel
> version of up time, right? Given all this, I don't see how it can wander.

uptime() returns the first number from /proc/uptime as an int.
(currently it rounds down -- perhaps not the best)

> An interesting question: does it wander if ntp is not in the mix?

I think yes. I just get the bug reports. (well, 1/2 of them)
I'm guessing this is a PC problem; I have a Mac.



-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 14:05    [W:0.092 / U:2.952 seconds]
©2003-2017 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site