lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2001]   [May]   [1]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRE: Linux Cluster using shared scsi
Date
So, will Linux ever support the scsi reservation mechanism as standard ?
Isn't there a standard that says if you scsi reserve a disk, no one
else should be able to access this disk, or is this a "steeleye/Compaq"
standard.

Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: James Bottomley [mailto:James.Bottomley@SteelEye.com]
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2001 5:12 PM
To: Roets, Chris
Cc: linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org; linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
Subject: Re: Linux Cluster using shared scsi

I've copied linux SCSI and quoted the entire message below so they can
follow.

Your assertion that this works in 2.2.16 is incorrect, the patch to fix the
linux reservation conflict handler has never been added to the official
tree.
I suspect you actually don't have vanilla 2.2.16 but instead have a redhat
or
other distribution patched version. Most distributions include the Steeleye

SCSI clustering patches which correct reservation handling.

I've attached the complete patch, which fixes both the old and the new error

handlers in the 2.2 kernel it applies against 2.2.18.

James Bottomley


> Problem :
> install two Linux-system with a shared scsi-bus and storage on that shared
> bus.
> suppose :
> system one : SCSI ID 7
> system two : SCSI ID 6
> shared disk : SCSI ID 4
>
> By default, you can mount the disk on both system. This is normal
> behavior, but
> may impose data corruption.
> To prevent this, you can SCSI-reserve a disk on one system. If the other
> system
> would try to access this device, the system should return an i/o error due
> to the reservation.
> This is a common technique used in
> - Traditional Tru64 Unix ase clustering
> - Tr64 Unix V5 Clustering to accomplish i/o barriers
> - Windows-NT Clusters
> - Steel-eye clustering
> The reservation can be done using a standard tool like scu
>
> scu -f /dev/sdb
> scu > reserve device
>
> On Linux, this works fine under Kernel version 2.2.16.
> Below is the code that accomplish this
> /usr/src/linux/drivers/scsi/scsi_obsolete.c in routine scsi_old_done
> case RESERVATION_CONFLICT:
> printk("scsi%d (%d,%d,%d) : RESERVATION CONFLICT\n",
> SCpnt->host->host_no, SCpnt->channel,
> SCpnt->device->id, SCpnt->device->lun);
> status = CMD_FINISHED; /* returns I/O error */
> break;
> default:
> As of kernel version 2.2.18, this code has changed, If a scsi reserve
> error
> occurs, the device driver does a scsi reset. This way the scsi
> reservation is
> gone, and the device can be accessed.
> /usr/src/linux/drivers/scsi/scsi_obsolete.c in routine scsi_old_done
> case RESERVATION_CONFLICT:
> printk("scsi%d, channel %d : RESERVATION CONFLICT
> performing"
> " reset.\n", SCpnt->host->host_no, SCpnt->channel);
> scsi_reset(SCpnt, SCSI_RESET_SYNCHRONOUS);
> status = REDO;
> break;
>
> Fix : delete the scsi reset in the kernel code
> case RESERVATION_CONFLICT:
> /* Deleted Chris Roets
> printk("scsi%d, channel %d : RESERVATION CONFLICT
> performing"
> " reset.\n", SCpnt->host->host_no, SCpnt->channel);
> scsi_reset(SCpnt, SCSI_RESET_SYNCHRONOUS);
> status = REDO;
> next four lines added */
> printk("scsi%d (%d,%d,%d) : RESERVATION CONFLICT\n",
> SCpnt->host->host_no, SCpnt->channel,
> SCpnt->device->id, SCpnt->device->lun);
> status = CMD_FINISHED; /* returns I/O error */
> break;
>
> and rebuild the kernel.
>
> This should get the customer being able to continue
>
Questions :
> - why is this scsi reset done/added as of kernel version 2.2.18
> - as we are talking about an obsolete routine, how is this accomplished
> in the new code and how is it activated.
>
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 12:52    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans