lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2000]   [Oct]   [31]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: 2.2.18Pre Lan Performance Rocks!
{lots of perf stuff deleted}
I'm posting this to point out that Linux networking is getting better at
a substantial pace.

I've already sent this to Davem and Linus a while back, but I have a
pretty nice lab here at BitMover, 4 100Mbit switched networks, servers
with 4 cards, and enough clients to generate load. I actually have
two servers both of which have a NIC on each network; one server has
.2.15pre9 on it and the other has 2.4.0-test5 on it.

I don't have a lot of spare time, but if you are one of the kernel
developers and you have tests you want run, contact me privately.

I ran some tests to see how things have changed. What follows are the
details, the short summary is that 2.4 looks to me to be about 2x better
in both latency and bandwidth, no mean feat. I'm very impressed with
this, and I'm especially tickled to see the hand that Dave has had in
this, he's really come into his own as a senior kernel hacker. I'm sure
he doesn't need me to stroke his ego, but I'm doing it anyways because
I'm proud of him (with no disrespect to the many other people who have
worked on this intended).

So here's what I did. I fired up the lat_tcp and bw_tcp servers from
lmbench on the server and then generated load from all the clients.
I noodled around until I found the right mix which gave the best numbers
and that's roughly what is reported below. I don't have the 2.2 numbers
handy but I can get them if you care, it was very close to 2x worse,
like about 1.9x or so.

The server is running Linux 2.4 test9, I believe. It has 3 Intel EEpro's
and one 3c905B. It's a Ghz K7.

Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82557 [Ethernet Pro 100] (rev 8).
Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82557 [Ethernet Pro 100] (#2) (rev 8).
Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82557 [Ethernet Pro 100] (#3) (rev 8).
Ethernet controller: 3Com Corporation 3c905B 100BaseTX [Cyclone] (rev 48).

All are going into Netgear Fs308 8 port switches. There are 13 clients,
mostly Intel Linux boxes, but various others as well, let me know if
you care. A couple of the clients were behind two levels of switches
(I have 6 here).

Run a single copy of lat_tcp on each client against the server, we see:
load free cach swap pgin pgou dk0 dk1 dk2 dk3 ipkt opkt int ctx usr sys idl
4.68 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42K 39K 55K 46K 4 96 0
4.68 443M 21M 0 0 2.0K 0 0 0 0 40K 38K 55K 44K 2 98 0
4.68 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40K 38K 55K 44K 3 97 0
4.55 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42K 40K 54K 48K 4 96 0
4.55 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 41K 39K 54K 45K 3 97 0
4.50 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40K 38K 54K 44K 2 98 0
4.50 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 41K 38K 55K 44K 3 97 0
4.50 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 41K 41K 54K 45K 7 93 0
4.86 443M 21M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38K 38K 54K 44K 3 97 0


OK, now bandwidth. Each client is capable of getting at least 11MB/sec from
the server when run one at a time. I ran just 4 clients, one per network.

load free cach swap pgin pgou dk0 dk1 dk2 dk3 ipkt opkt int ctx usr sys idl
0.28 444M 22M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14K 27K 15K 2.9K 2 55 43
0.28 444M 22M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14K 29K 16K 3.1K 2 66 32
0.26 444M 22M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14K 29K 16K 3.0K 1 67 32
0.26 444M 22M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15K 29K 16K 3.0K 1 65 34
0.24 444M 22M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15K 29K 16K 3.0K 0 70 30
0.24 444M 22M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15K 29K 16K 3.0K 0 63 37
0.24 444M 22M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14K 28K 16K 3.0K 1 62 37
0.22 444M 22M 0 2.0K 0 0 0 0 0 14K 28K 16K 2.9K 1 65 34

It works out to an average of 10.4MB/sec per client or 41.6MB/sec on the
server on a PCI/32 @ 33Mhz bus. Same Ghz server. Note the idle cycles,
bandwidth is a lot easier than latency.

Hope this is useful to someone.
--
---
Larry McVoy lm at bitmover.com http://www.bitmover.com/lm
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 12:45    [from the cache]
©2003-2014 Jasper Spaans. Advertise on this site