lkml.org 
[lkml]   [1998]   [Oct]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: network nicety
On Wed, 7 Oct 1998, Bob Lanning wrote:

> This is in IPv6. Traffic prioritization. There are boxes that sit in the
> middle of you stream and mess with TCP streams to prioritize traffic.
> Packeteer is one.
>
> It is very hard to implement something like this. The data channel for ftp
> has no real identification in it. The best way of doing this is in the
> application.
>

The server sits on a well-known port right/?

> ---- As written by David Feuer:
> >
> > If this has been rejected or implemented before, please let me know,
> > but....
> >
> > I am often frustrated that when I am running a network-intensive
> > long-term process (generally a big FTP download), I get a big slowdown
> > of burst-oriented interactive use (email, web browser, etc.). This is a
> > particular problem since I am using a PPP connection. I have a couple
> > ideas for solving this problem, and similar ones.
> >
> > First, I think that programs should have a netnice value (nnice?), along
> > with a nice value. When transmitting packets, lower niceness processes
> > (or threads.....) get higher priority. So if I were running a
> > significant-use ftp server, I could set the netnice for my ftp server to
> > 13, allowing other processes on my machine to have better
> > responsiveness. Similarly, when using an ftp client to upload something
> > big, I could set the netnice to 17 and keep on browsing. The best thing
> > is that the performance of those big network transfers would not really
> > go down much. They would just interfere less.
> >
> > This is only half a solution. It pretty much only solves sender-side
> > problems. For home systems such as mine the big issue is receiver-end.
> > When I am doing a big FTP download, web browsing often slows to a
> > crawl. I was thinking that there might be some way to combine
> > kernel-level changes with a modification of the pppd client+server to
> > support some prioritization of the PPP link. I don't really know how
> > this would work. It would be nice if I could set the nicety of a
> > receiving program (ftp client, etc.), and have that tell the PPP server
> > on the other end that it should make packets destined to ports owned by
> > this process a low priority. One possibility would be to buffer them
> > until there was network time (or their brief turn came around), and
> > dropping their packets when the buffer is full.
> >
> > I think that some of these ideas (probably with huge modifications)
> > could help improve Linux network performance.
> > --
> >
> > Remove "NOSPAM" to reply.
> > ______________________________
> > / David Feuer \
> > | dfeuer@NOSPAMbinx.mbhs.edu |
> > | feuer@NOSPAMhis.com |
> > | daf@morseNOSPAM.usno.navy.mil|
> > \ david@NOSPAMfeuer.his.com /
> > -----------------------------
> >
> > -
> > To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
> > the body of a message to majordomo@vger.rutgers.edu
> > Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
> >
>
>
> --
> Robert Hajime Lanning Navigation Technologies
> Unix Systems Administrator 740 E. Arques Ave.
> (408) 617-5059 Sunnyvale, CA 94086
> lanning@fhda.edu USA
> lanning@kewltech.com lanning@navtech.com
>
> -
> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.rutgers.edu
> Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/
>


-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.rutgers.edu
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 13:44    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans